Sock definition

sŏk
A short stocking reaching a point between the ankle and the knee.
noun
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1
(meteorology) A windsock.
noun
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Comic drama; comedy.
noun
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A hard blow or punch.
noun
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A knitted covering for the foot and ankle, like a short stocking, sometimes extending to just below the knee.
noun
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noun
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To hit or strike with force, esp. with the fist.
verb
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A blow.
noun
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Directly; squarely.
adverb
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A knitted or woven covering for the foot.
noun
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A shoe worn by Greco-Roman comedy actors.
noun
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A violent blow, punch.
noun
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A shortened version of (Internet) sock puppet.

"For enemies near are enemies known though socks are a bother he feels at last not alone"

noun
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(firearms, informal) A gun sock.
noun
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To hit or strike violently.
verb
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(intransitive) To deliver a blow.

They may let you off the first time, but the second time they'll sock it to you. "” James Jones.

verb
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noun
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A light shoe worn by comic characters in ancient Greek and Roman drama.
noun
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Comedy or the muse of comedy.
noun
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A light shoe worn by comic actors in ancient Greek and Roman plays.
noun
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To provide with socks.
verb
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To hit or strike forcefully; punch.
verb
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To deliver a blow.
verb
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(slang) sock it to (someone)
  • To deliver a forceful comment, reprimand, or physical blow to someone else.
idiom
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sock away
  • to set aside (money), esp. as savings
idiom
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sock in
  • to ground (an aircraft) or close (an airfield) as because of fog
idiom
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sock it to
  • to confront, rebuke, attack, or otherwise treat harshly or severely
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
sock
Plural:
SOCKS

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

sock it to (someone)
sock it to

Origin of sock

  • Middle English socke from Old English socc a kind of light shoe from Latin soccus possibly from Greek sunkhis, sukkhos Phrygian shoe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English socc, a West Germanic borrowing from Latin soccus, from Ancient Greek σύκχος (sunkhos, “a kind of shoe"), probably from Phrygian or another language from Asia Minor.

    From Wiktionary

  • Unknown, but compare Portuguese soco ("a hit with one's hand; a punch").

    From Wiktionary

  • French soc, Late Latin soccus, perhaps of Celtic origin.

    From Wiktionary