Comedy meaning

kŏmĭ-dē
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The definition of a comedy is a play, film or book that is light, funny and generally has a happy ending or any entertainment or amusement that is funny.

An example of a comedy is Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.

An example of a comedy is a show made up of joke telling.

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Popular entertainment composed of jokes, satire, or humorous performance.
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An amusing or comic event or sequence of events.
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A literary or cinematic work of a comic nature or that uses the themes or methods of comedy.
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The art of composing or performing comedy.
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A drama or narrative with a happy ending or nontragic theme.

Dante's Divine Comedy.

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A novel or any narrative having a comic theme, tone, etc.
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The comic element in a literary work, or in life.
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Archaic Greece. a choric song of celebration or revel.
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Ancient Greece. a light, amusing play with a happy ending.
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Medieval Europe. a narrative poem with an agreeable ending (e.g., The Divine Comedy)
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(drama) A dramatic work that is light and humorous or satirical in tone.
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(drama) The genre of such works.
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Entertainment composed of jokes, satire, or humorous performance.

Why would you be watching comedy when there are kids starving right now?

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The art of composing comedy.
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A humorous event.
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A humorous element of life or literature.

The human comedy of political campaigns.

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A humorous occurrence.
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comedy of errors
  • A ludicrous event or sequence of events:.
    The candidate's campaign turned out to be a political comedy of errors.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of comedy

  • Middle English comedie from Medieval Latin cōmēdia from Latin cōmoedia from Greek kōmōidia from kōmōidos comic actor kōmos revel aoidos singer (from aeidein to sing wed-2 in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested in 1374. From Old French comedie, from Latin cōmoedia, from Ancient Greek κωμῳδία (kōmōidia), from κῶμος (kōmos, “revel, carousing”) + either ᾠδή (ōidē, “song”) or ἀοιδός (aoidos, “singer, bard”), both from ἀείδω (aeidō, “I sing”).

    From Wiktionary