Joke meaning

jōk
To speak in fun; be facetious.

You have to be joking.

verb
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To joke is defined as to do or say something for fun.

An example of to joke is to play a trick on someone.

verb
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To say or write as a joke.
verb
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To tell or play jokes; jest.
verb
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The definition of a joke is something said or done for laughter or amusement.

An example of a joke is, "Why did the chicken cross the road?" "To get to the other side."

noun
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Something said or done to evoke laughter or amusement, especially an amusing story with a punch line.
noun
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A mischievous trick; a prank.

Played a joke on his roommate.

noun
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Something that is of ludicrously poor quality.

Their delivery service is a joke.

noun
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Anything said or done to arouse laughter.
  • A funny anecdote with a punchline.
  • An amusing trick played on someone.
noun
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(figuratively) A worthless thing or person.

Your effort at cleaning your room is a joke.

The president was a joke.

noun
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The humorous element in a situation.
noun
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A thing done or said merely in fun.
noun
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A person or thing to be laughed at, not to be taken seriously, because absurd, ridiculous, etc.
noun
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To tell or play jokes.
verb
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To say or do something as a joke; jest.
verb
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To make fun of; make (a person) the object of jokes or teasing.
verb
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To bring to a specified condition by joking.
verb
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An amusing story.
noun
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Something said or done for amusement, not in seriousness.

It was a joke!

noun
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(figuratively) The root cause or main issue, especially an unexpected one.
noun
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(intransitive) To do or say something for amusement rather than seriously.

I didn’t mean what I said — I was only joking.

verb
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(dated) To make merry with; to make jokes upon; to rally.

To joke a comrade.

verb
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no joke
  • A serious matter.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

no joke

Origin of joke

  • Latin iocus yek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • from Latin iocus

    From Wiktionary