Trick meaning

trĭk
The definition of a trick is a prank or a joke.

An example of a trick is jumping out from behind a door and scaring someone.

noun
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To trick is defined as to make an illusion, or to play a joke or prank.

An example of to trick is when the light reflection makes it appear that there are four items when, in fact, there are only three.

verb
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Of, relating to, or involving tricks.
adjective
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A robbery or theft.
noun
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To cheat or deceive or to practice trickery or deception.
verb
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(card games) A sequence in which each player plays a card and a winning play is determined.

I was able to take the second trick with the queen of hearts.

noun
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(slang) An act of prostitution. Generally used with turn.

At the worst point, she was turning ten tricks a day.

noun
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Designed or made for doing a trick or tricks.

Trick cards; trick dice.

adjective
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Weak, defective, or liable to fail.

A trick knee.

adjective
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An action or device designed to deceive, cheat, outwit, etc.; artifice; dodge; ruse; stratagem.
noun
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A freakish, foolish, mean, or stupid act.
noun
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A clever or difficult act intended to amuse.
  • An act of jugglery or sleight of hand; also, an illusion of the kind created by legerdemain.
  • An action, feat, or routine performed by an animal as a result of training.
noun
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Any feat requiring skill.
noun
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The art or knack of doing something easily, skillfully, quickly, etc.

The trick of making good pastry.

noun
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An expedient or convention of an art, craft, or trade.

To learn the tricks of the trade.

noun
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A personal habit or mannerism.

A trick of tugging at the ear.

noun
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A turn or round of duty or work; shift.
noun
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A child or girl, esp. one viewed as cute or pretty.
noun
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The cards (one from each player) played and won in a single round.
noun
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To deceive or swindle.
verb
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Having to do with or used for a trick or tricks.
adjective
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That tricks.
adjective
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Apt to malfunction; of uncertain reliability.

A trick knee.

adjective
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(slang) Stylish or cool.

Wow, your new sportscar is so trick.

adjective
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Something designed to fool or swindle.

It was just a trick to say that the house was underpriced.

noun
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A single piece (business) of a magician's (any variety entertainer's) act.

And for my next trick, I will pull a wombat out of a duffel bag.

noun
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An effective, clever or quick way of doing something.

Tricks of the trade; what's the trick of getting this chair to fold up?

noun
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Mischievous or annoying behavior; a prank.

The tricks of boys.

noun
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(dated) A particular habit or manner; a peculiarity; a trait.

A trick of drumming with the fingers; a trick of frowning.

noun
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A knot, braid, or plait of hair.

noun
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(slang) A customer to a prostitute.

As the businessman rounded the corner, she thought, "Here comes another trick."

noun
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That's a nice skateboard, but can you do any tricks on it?

noun
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A daily period of work, especially in shift-based jobs.
noun
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(nautical) A sailor's spell of work at the helm, usually two hours long.
noun
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A toy; a trifle; a plaything.

noun
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To fool; to cause to believe something untrue; to deceive.

You tried to trick me when you said that house was underpriced.

verb
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(heraldry) To draw (as opposed to blazon - to describe in words).
verb
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To dress; to decorate; to adorn fantastically; often followed by up, off, or out.
verb
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Capable of performing tricks.

A trick dog.

adjective
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do
  • To bring about the desired result.
idiom
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how's tricks
  • Used to make a friendly inquiry about a person or that person's affairs.
idiom
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not miss a trick
  • To be extremely alert:.
    The teacher was known for not missing a trick.
idiom
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do the trick
  • To bring about the desired result.
idiom
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not miss a trick
  • To be very alert.
idiom
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trick out
  • To dress up; deck; array.
idiom
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turn a trick
  • To have sex with a customer.
idiom
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up to one's old tricks
  • Behaving or, esp., misbehaving in a way regarded as characteristic.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

not miss a trick
not miss a trick
up to one's old tricks

Origin of trick

  • Middle English trik from Old North French trique from trikier to deceive probably from Vulgar Latin triccāre from Latin trīcārī to play tricks from trīcae tricks
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Perhaps from Old Northern French trique (related to Old French trichier; French: tricher), itself possibly from Middle High German trechen (“to launch a shot at, play a trick on”), but the Old French verb more likely is derived from Vulgar Latin *triccāre, from Late Latin tricāre, from Latin trīcārī (“behave in an evasive manner, search for detours; trifle, delay”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Alternatively, perhaps from Dutch trek (“a pull, draw, trick”), from trekken (“to draw”), from Middle Dutch trekken, trēken (“to pull, place, put, move”), from Old Dutch *trekkan, *trekan (“to move, drag”), from Proto-Germanic *trakjaną, *trikaną (“to drag, scrape, pull”), from Proto-Indo-European *dreg- (“to drag, scrape”).
    From Wiktionary