Dutch definition

dŭch
Of the Netherlands or its people, language, or culture.
adjective
5
1
Of or relating to the Netherlands or its people or culture.
adjective
2
0
Of the Pennsylvania Dutch or their language or culture.
adjective
2
0
The West Germanic language spoken in the Netherlands.
noun
2
0
Of or relating to the Pennsylvania Dutch.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Of or relating to the Dutch language.
adjective
0
0
German.
adjective
0
0
Of or relating to any of the Germanic peoples or languages.
adjective
0
0
(slang) Anger or temper.
noun
0
0
The people of the Netherlands.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(archaic) A Germanic people.
noun
0
0
The Pennsylvania Dutch.
noun
0
0
The official West Germanic language of the Netherlands and one of the official languages of Belgium.
noun
0
0
(archaic) One or more of the West Germanic languages of Germany, Switzerland, and the Low Countries.
noun
0
0
(slang) Wife.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(archaic) Pertaining to the Dutch, the Germans, and the Goths; Germanic, Teutonic.
adjective
0
0
Of or pertaining to the Netherlands, the Dutch people or the Dutch language.
adjective
0
0
In a shared manner; of a shared expense. (See Dutch treat; compare go Dutch.)
adjective
0
0
The main language of the Netherlands and Flanders (i.e., the northern half of Belgium).
pronoun
0
0
(collective) The people of the Netherlands.

The Dutch will vote on the matter next month.

pronoun
0
0
Advertisement
(obsolete) A German.
noun
0
0
go Dutch
  • To pay one's own expenses on a date or outing.
idiom
0
0
in Dutch
  • In disfavor or trouble.
idiom
0
0
go Dutch
  • to have every participant pay his or her own expenses
idiom
0
0
in Dutch
  • in trouble or disfavor
idiom
0
0
Advertisement
the Dutch
  • the people of the Netherlands
  • the Pennsylvania Dutch
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
dutch
Plural:
dutches

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of dutch

  • Middle English Duch German, Dutch from Middle Dutch Dūtsch teutā- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English Duch (“German, Low Countryman”), from Middle Dutch dūtsch, duutsc (modern Duits (“German”)), northern variant of dietsc (compare modern Diets (“Dutch language”)), from Proto-Germanic *þiudiskaz (compare German Deutsch (“German”), Old English þēodisc (“of the people”)), from Proto-Germanic *þeudō ‘people’, from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂. See also Derrick, Teuton, Teutonic.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle Dutch duutsc is the result of i-mutation (umlaut) typical of central dialects (Brabantine) while dietsc shows the merger of iu with io and weakening to [iə] typical of coastal dialects (Flemish). This led to doublets which split in meaning during the Renaissance.

    From Wiktionary

  • Short for duchess

    From Wiktionary