Predicament meaning

prĭ-dĭk'ə-mənt
An unfortunate or trying position or condition; a tight spot.
noun
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A condition or situation, now specif. one that is difficult, unpleasant, embarrassing, or, sometimes, comical.
noun
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5
The definition of predicament is a difficult or unpleasant situation.

An example of a predicament is a wife walking into the restaurant where her husband is having lunch with his mistress.

noun
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3
A definite class, state or condition.
noun
6
3
A situation, especially an unpleasant, troublesome, or trying one, from which extrication is difficult.
noun
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4
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One of the basic states or classifications described by Aristotle into which all things can be placed; a category.
noun
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(logic) That which is predicated; a category.
noun
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1
noun
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Origin of predicament

  • Middle English class, category from Old French from Late Latin praedicāmentum (translation of Greek katēgoriā) (from katēgoreuein to speak against, signify, predicate) from Latin praedicāre to proclaim publicly, predicate preach
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French, from Late Latin praedicamentum (“that which is predicated, a predicament, category, Medieval Latin also a preaching, discourse"), from Latin praedicare (“to declare, proclaim, predicate"); see predicate.
    From Wiktionary