Category meaning

kătĭ-gôrē
Frequency:
A specifically defined division in a system of classification; a class.
noun
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The definition of a category is any sort of division or class.

An example of category is food that is made from grains.

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A class or division in a scheme of classification.
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Any of the various basic concepts into which all knowledge can be classified.
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See Cat.
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A general class of ideas, terms, or things that mark divisions or coordinations within a conceptual scheme, especially:
  • Aristotle's modes of objective being, such as quality, quantity, or relation, that are inherent in everything.
  • Kant's modes of subjective understanding, such as singularity, universality, or particularity, that organize perceptions into knowledge.
  • A basic logical type of philosophical conception in post-Kantian philosophy.
noun
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A group, often named or numbered, to which items are assigned based on similarity or defined criteria.

This steep and dangerous climb belongs to the most difficult category.

I wouldn't put this book in the same category as the author's first novel.

noun
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(mathematics) A collection of objects, together with a transitively closed collection of composable arrows between them, such that every object has an identity arrow, and such that arrow composition is associative.

One well-known category has sets as objects and functions as arrows.

Just as a monoid consists of an underlying set with a binary operation "on top of it" which is closed, associative and with an identity, a category consists of an underlying digraph with an arrow composition operation "on top of it" which is transitively closed, associative, and with an identity at each object. In fact, a category's composition operation, when restricted to a single one of its objects, turns that object's set of arrows (which would all be loops) into a monoid.

noun
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A class of objects, together with a class of morphisms between those objects, and an associative composition rule for those morphisms. Categories are used to study a wide variety of mathematical constructions in a similar way.
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Origin of category

  • French catégorie from Old French from Late Latin catēgoria class of predicables from Greek katēgoriā accusation, charge from katēgorein to accuse, predicate kat-, kata- down, against cata– agoreuein ēgor- to speak in public (from agorā marketplace, assembly ger- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French categorie, from Late Latin categoria (“class of predicables”), from Ancient Greek κατηγορία (kategoria, “head of predicables”).

    From Wiktionary