Language meaning

lănggwĭj
Frequency:
The definition of language is speech or other forms of communication.

An example of language is words spoken.

An example of language is words read in a book.

An example of language is people using their hands to express themselves.

noun
76
13
A system of objects or symbols, such as sounds or character sequences, that can be combined in various ways following a set of rules, especially to communicate thoughts, feelings, or instructions.
63
7
A particular manner of expression.

Profane language; persuasive language.

noun
44
12
The wording of a legal document or statute as distinct from the spirit.
noun
31
13
The study of language in general or of some particular language or languages; linguistics.
noun
29
8
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(countable) A form of communication using words either spoken or gestured with the hands and structured with grammar, often with a writing system.
noun
13
1
The particular form or manner of selecting and combining words characteristic of a person, group, or profession; form or style of expression in words.

The language of teenagers.

noun
13
3
The set of patterns or structures produced by such a system.
13
6
Verbal communication as a subject of study.
noun
11
0
The manner or means of communication between living creatures other than humans.

The language of dolphins.

noun
9
5
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A characteristic style of speech or writing.

Shakespearean language.

noun
7
4
The special vocabulary and usages of a scientific, professional, or other group.
noun
5
1
Body language; kinesics.
noun
5
2
All the vocal sounds, words, and ways of combining them common to a particular nation, tribe, or other speech community.

The French language.

noun
5
3
(informal) Coarse or obscene words and expressions.
noun
4
2
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speak the same (or someone's) language
  • to have the same beliefs, attitudes, etc. (as another)
idiom
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4

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

speak the same (<i>or</i> someone's) language

Origin of language

  • Middle English from Old French langage from langue tongue, language from Latin lingua dn̥ghū- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English language, from Old French language, from Vulgar Latin *linguāticum, from Latin lingua (“tongue, speech, language”), from Old Latin dingua (“tongue”), from Proto-Indo-European *dn̥ǵʰwéh₂s (“tongue, speech, language”). Displaced native Middle English rearde, ȝerearde (“language”) (from Old English reord (“language, speech”)), Middle English londspreche, londspeche (“language”) (from Old English *landsprǣċ (“language, national tongue”), Old English þēod and þēodisc (“language”).

    From Wiktionary