Dress meaning

drĕs
To garnish.

Dressed the side dish with parsley.

verb
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To arrange (troops) in ranks; align.
verb
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The definition of a dress is a one-piece garment consisting of a top and skirt that is usually worn by a woman.

A long formal garment worn at a prom is an example of a dress.

noun
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To decorate or adorn.

Dress a Christmas tree.

verb
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To arrange a display in.

Dress a store window.

verb
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To apply medication, bandages, or other therapeutic materials to (a wound).
verb
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To arrange and groom (the hair), as by styling, combing, or washing.
verb
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To groom (an animal); curry.
verb
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To clean (fish or fowl) for cooking or sale.
verb
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To put on clothes.
verb
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To wear clothes of a certain kind or style.

Dresses casually.

verb
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To wear formal clothes.

Dress for dinner.

verb
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To get into proper alignment with others.

The troops dressed on the squad leader.

verb
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Clothing; apparel.
noun
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A style of clothing.

Folk dancers in peasant dress.

noun
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A one-piece outer garment for women or girls.
noun
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Outer covering or appearance; guise.

An ancient ritual in modern dress.

noun
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Suitable for formal occasions.

Dress shoes.

adjective
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Requiring formal clothes.

A dress dinner.

adjective
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To put clothes on; clothe.
verb
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To provide with clothing.
verb
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To decorate; trim; adorn.
verb
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To arrange a display in.

To dress a store window.

verb
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To arrange or do up (the hair)
verb
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To arrange (troops) in a straight line or lines.
verb
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To apply medicines and bandages to (a wound, sore, etc.)
verb
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To put on clothes; wear clothes.
verb
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To dress in formal clothes.
verb
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To get into a straight line or proper alignment.
verb
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Clothes, clothing, or apparel, esp. as suitable for certain occasions [casual dress] or for a certain place or time.

Modern dress.

noun
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An outer garment for women, having a skirt and usually made in one piece: formerly and traditionally the usual garment for women.
noun
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Formal clothes.
noun
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External covering or appearance.
noun
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Of or for dresses.

Dress material.

adjective
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Worn on formal occasions.

A dress suit.

adjective
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Requiring formal clothes.

A dress occasion.

adjective
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To apply medication, bandages, or other therapeutic materials to an area of the body such as a wound.
verb
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(countable) An item of clothing (usually worn by a woman or young girl) which both covers the upper part of the body and includes skirts below the waist.

Amy and Mary looked very pretty in their dresses.

noun
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(uncountable) Apparel, clothing.

He came to the party in formal dress.

noun
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The system of furrows on the face of a millstone.
noun
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Dress rehearsal.
noun
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To adorn, ornament. [from 15th c.]

It was time to dress the windows for Christmas again.

verb
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(nautical) To ornament (a ship) by hoisting the national colours at the peak and mastheads, and setting the jack forward; when "dressed full", the signal flags and pennants are added.
verb
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To treat (a wound, or wounded person). [from 15th c.]
verb
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To prepare (food) for cooking, especially by seasoning it. [from 15th c.]
verb
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To fit out with the necessary clothing; to clothe, put clothes on (something or somebody). [from 15th c.]

He was dressed in the latest fashions.

verb
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(intransitive) To clothe oneself; to put on clothes. [from 18th c.]

I rose and dressed before daybreak. It's very cold out. Dress warm.

verb
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(intransitive) Of a man, to allow the genitals to fall to one side or other of the trousers. [from 20th c.]

Does sir dress to the right or the left?

verb
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To prepare for use; to fit for any use; to render suitable for an intended purpose; to get ready.

To dress leather or cloth; to dress a garden; to dress grain, by cleansing it; in mining and metallurgy, to dress ores, by sorting and separating them.

verb
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To prepare the surface of (a material; usually stone or lumber).
verb
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(military, intransitive) To arrange in exact continuity of line, as soldiers; commonly to adjust to a straight line and at proper distance; to align. Sometimes an imperative command.

To dress the ranks.

Right, dress!

verb
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To break and train for use, as a horse or other animal.
verb
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To dress is to put on clothes, or to tend to a wound and cover it up properly so it will heal.

When you put on your pants and shoes, this is an example of a situation where you dress yourself.

When you put a bandage on a wound, this is an example of a situation where you dress the wound.

verb
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To treat as required in preparing for use, grooming, etc.
  • To clean and eviscerate (a fowl, deer, etc.).
  • To till, cultivate, or fertilize (fields or plants).
  • To curry (a horse, leather, etc.).
  • To smooth, finish, shape, etc. (stone, wood, etc.).
verb
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dress ship
  • To display the ensign, signal flags, and bunting on a ship.
idiom
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dress down
  • To scold severely; reprimand.
  • To wear casual clothes to an activity, job, etc. that ordinarily requires more formal dress.
idiom
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dress ship
  • To raise the ensign at each masthead and the flagstaff and, often, string signal flags over the mastheads from bow to stern.
idiom
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dress up
  • To dress in formal clothes, or in clothes more elegant, showy, etc. than one usually wears.
  • To improve the appearance of, as by decorating.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

dress ship
dress ship

Origin of dress

  • Middle English dressen to arrange, put on clothing from Old French drecier to arrange from Vulgar Latin dīrēctiāre from Latin dīrēctus past participle of dīrigere to direct direct
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old French dresser, drescer, drecier (“to erect, set up, arrange, dress”), from Medieval Latin * directiare, an assumed frequentive, from Latin directus (“ straight, direct”), perfect passive participle of dīrigō (“straighten, direct”), from dis- (“asunder, in pieces, apart, in two”) + regō (“make straight, rule”).
    From Wiktionary