Stitch meaning

stĭch
A stitch is defined as a loop of thread or yarn used to close a wound or fabric, or a tiny item of clothing, or a sudden sharp pain in your side that results from exercise.

An embroidery method is an example of a stitch.

When a doctor has sewed up a cut with thread to pull the skin together, this is an example of a stitch.

A tiny little skirt is an example of a stitch of clothing.

A pain in your side you get when you run is an example of a stitch.

noun
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To fasten or unite (cartons, booklets, etc.) with staples.
verb
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An arrangement of stitches in sewing, or method of stitching in some particular way or style.

Cross stitch.

Herringbone stitch.

noun
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A bit or piece; specif., an article of clothing.

Wearing not a stitch.

noun
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To make stitches; sew.
verb
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To fasten, join, repair, adorn, or operate upon with or as with stitches; sew.
verb
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A sudden sharp pain, especially in the side.
noun
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A single suture.
noun
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To suture.
verb
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A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.
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(sports) An intense stabbing pain under the lower edge of the ribcage, caused by internal organs pulling downwards on the diaphragm during exercise.
noun
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A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn.

Drop a stitch.

Take up a stitch.

noun
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An arrangement of stitches in knitting, or method of knitting in some particular way or style.
noun
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A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle.
noun
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Hence, by extension, any space passed over; distance.

You have gone a good stitch. "” John Bunyan.In Syria the husbandmen go lightly over with their plow, and take no deep stitch in making their furrows. "” Holland.

noun
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A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle.

A stitch in the side.

noun
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(colloquial) Any least part of a fabric or dress.

To wet every stitch of clothes.

She didn't have a stitch on.

noun
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A furrow.

noun
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To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches.

To stitch a shirt bosom.

verb
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To sew, or unite or attach by stitches.

To stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet.

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(agriculture) To form land into ridges.
verb
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(intransitive) To practice/practise stitching or needlework.
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(computing, graphics) To combine two or more photographs of the same scene into a single image.

I can use this software to stitch together a panorama.

verb
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The definition of stitch is to join or adorn with yarn or thread.

When you sew a hem, this is an example of when you stitch.

verb
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A sudden sharp pain, especially in the side.
noun
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An article of clothing.

Wore not a stitch.

noun
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The least part; a bit.

Didn't do a stitch of work.

noun
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To decorate or ornament, as with stitches.
verb
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To fasten together with staples or thread.
verb
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To make stitches; sew, knit, crochet, or suture.
verb
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A single loop of yarn worked off a needle in knitting, crocheting, etc.
noun
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The piece of thread worked in, or a loop, knot, etc. made, by stitching.
noun
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A particular kind of stitch or style of stitching.
noun
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A sudden, sharp pain in the side or back.
noun
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in stitches
  • Laughing uncontrollably.
idiom
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in stitches
  • In a state of uproarious laughter.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of stitch

  • Middle English stiche from Old English stice sting steig- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English stiche, from Old English stiÄ‹e (“a prick, puncture, stab, thrust with a pointed implement, pricking sensation, stitch, pain in the side, sting"), from Proto-Germanic *stikiz (“prick, piercing, stitch"), from Proto-Indo-European *steg- (“to stab, pierce"). Cognate with Dutch steek (“prick, stitch"), German Stich (“a prick, piercing, stitch"), Old English stician (“to stick, stab, pierce, prick"). More at stick.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old English stiÄ‹ian
    From Wiktionary