Smart meaning

smärt
Smart is the act of having intelligence.

An example of smart is someone with a high IQ.

noun
18
2
The definition of smart is someone who is intelligent, someone who is well dressed and looking sharp or something that can act on its own accord.

An example of smart is a person with a high IQ.

An example of smart is someone who is dressed neatly in fashionable clothes.

An example of smart is a computer that can perform some functions without the aid of people.

adjective
10
3
Smart is sharp mental or physical pain.

An example of smart is how your arm feels after a shot.

noun
10
5
(informal) Insolent, flippant, etc.
adjective
4
0
(1) (SMART) (Self-Monitoring Analysis and Reporting Technology) See SMART HDD.
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1
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Sharp or stinging, as pain.
adjective
3
1
(archaic) Efficient; vigorous; brilliant.
adjective
3
1
Capable of making adjustments that resemble those resulting from human decisions, chiefly by means of electronic sensors and computer technology.

Smart missiles; smart machines.

adjective
3
2
(slang) Intelligence; expertise.

A reporter with a lot of smarts.

noun
2
0
To cause to smart.
verb
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0
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A smarting sensation, pain or distress.
noun
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0
(slang) Shrewdness, intelligence, or acumen.
noun
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0
(intransitive) To hurt or sting.

After being hit with a pitch, the batter exclaimed "Ouch, my arm smarts!"

verb
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To cause a smart or sting in.
verb
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0
Causing sharp or stinging pain.

A smart slap.

adjective
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Brisk; vigorous; lively.

Walking at a smart pace.

adjective
1
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In a smart way.
adverb
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(person) 1722-71; Eng. poet.
proper name
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To feel a pungent pain of mind; to feel sharp pain or grief; to suffer; to feel the sting of evil.
verb
1
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Causing sharp pain; stinging.
adjective
1
0
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A smart pain.

adjective
1
0
Exhibiting social ability or cleverness.
adjective
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0
Exhibiting intellectual knowledge, such as that found in books.
adjective
1
0
(often in combination) Equipped with intelligent behaviour.

Smart bomb, smart car.

Smartcard, smartphone.

adjective
1
0

A smart outfit.

adjective
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0
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Cleverly shrewd and humorous in a way that may be rude and disrespectful.

He became tired of his daughter's sarcasm and smart remarks.

adjective
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0
Sudden and intense.
adjective
1
0
(US, Southern, dated) Intense in feeling; painful. Used usually with the adverb intensifier right.

He raised his voice, and it hurt her feelings right smart.

That cast on his leg chaffs him right smart.

adjective
1
0
(archaic) Pretentious; showy; spruce.

A smart gown.

adjective
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0
(archaic) Brisk; fresh.

A smart breeze.

adjective
1
0
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A sharp, quick, lively pain; a sting.
noun
1
0
Mental pain or suffering; grief; affliction.
noun
1
0
noun
1
0
(slang, dated) A dandy; one who is smart in dress; one who is brisk, vivacious, or clever.

noun
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0
initialism
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Energetic or quick in movement.

A smart pace.

adjective
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0
Fashionable; elegant.

A smart suit; a smart restaurant; the smart set.

adjective
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0
To suffer acutely, as from mental distress, wounded feelings, or remorse.
verb
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0
Sharp pain or anguish.

The smart of the wound.

noun
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0
To feel mental distress or irritation, as in resentment, remorse, etc.
verb
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0
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Neat; trim; spruce.
adjective
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0
(dial.) Quite strong, intense, numerous, etc.; considerable.

A right smart rain.

adjective
0
1
(new england & southern us) right smart
  • A lot; a considerable amount:
idiom
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0
smart off
  • to be impertinent or flippant
idiom
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0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of smart

  • Middle English stinging, keen, alert from Old English smeart causing pain

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English smerten, from Old English smeortan (“to smart"), from Proto-Germanic *smertanÄ… (“to hurt, ache"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)merd- (“to bite, sting"). Cognate with Scots smert, Dutch smarten, German schmerzen, Danish smerte, Swedish smärta.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English smart, smarte, smerte, from Old English smeart (“smarting, smart, painful"), from Proto-Germanic *smartaz (“hurting, aching"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)merd- (“to bite, sting"). Cognate with Scots smert (“painful, smart"), Old Frisian smert (“sharp, painful").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English smerte, from smerten (“to smart"). See above. Cognate with Scots smert, Dutch smart, Low German smart, German Schmerz, Danish smerte, Swedish smärta. More above.

    From Wiktionary