Sense meaning

sĕns
The general opinion, sentiment, or attitude of a group.
noun
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An ability to feel, appreciate, or understand some quality.

A sense of humor, honor, etc.

noun
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To grasp; understand.

Sensed that the financial situation would improve.

verb
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To become aware of; perceive.

Organisms able to sense their surroundings.

verb
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The faculties of sensation as means of providing physical gratification and pleasure.
noun
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Of or relating to the portion of the strand of double-stranded DNA that serves as a template for and is transcribed into RNA.
adjective
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The ability of the nerves and the brain to receive and react to stimuli, as light, sound, impact, constriction, etc.; specif., any of five faculties of receiving impressions through specific bodily organs and the nerves associated with them (sight, touch, taste, smell, and hearing)
noun
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The senses considered as a total function of the bodily organism, as distinguished from intellect, movement, etc.
noun
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An ability to judge, discriminate, or estimate external conditions, sounds, etc.

A sense of direction, pitch, etc.

noun
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Either of two contrary directions that may be specified, as clockwise or counterclockwise for the circumference of a circle, positive or negative for a line segment, etc.
noun
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To be or become aware of.

To sense another's hostility.

verb
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To comprehend; understand.
verb
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To detect automatically, as by sensors.
verb
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To become aware of; perceive.

Organisms able to sense their surroundings.

verb
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To detect automatically.

Sense radioactivity.

verb
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Of or relating to the portion of the strand of double-stranded DNA that serves as a template for and is transcribed into RNA.
adjective
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Any of the methods for a living being to gather data about the world; sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste.
  • Shakespeare.
    Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep.
  • Milton.
    What surmounts the reach / Of human sense I shall delineate.
noun
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Perception through the intellect; apprehension; awareness.

A sense of security.

noun
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Sound practical or moral judgment.
  • L'Estrange.
    Some are so hardened in wickedness as to have no sense of the most friendly offices.

It's common sense not to put metal objects in a microwave oven.

noun
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The meaning, reason, or value of something.

You don't make any sense.

The true sense of words or phrases.

noun
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A natural appreciation or ability.

A keen musical sense.

noun
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(pragmatics) The way that a referent is presented.
noun
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(semantics) A single conventional use of a word; one of the entries for a word in a dictionary.
noun
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(mathematics) One of two opposite directions in which a vector (especially of motion) may point. See also polarity.
noun
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(mathematics) One of two opposite directions of rotation, clockwise versus anti-clockwise.
noun
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See also sense.
hyponyms
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To use biological senses: to either smell, watch, taste, hear or feel.
verb
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She immediately sensed her disdain.

verb
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verb
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The definition of sense is to perceive, or be aware of something.

If you believe that someone is angry even if they haven't said so, this is an example of when you can sense their anger.

verb
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A sense is defined as a way that the body perceives external stimuli, or is an awareness or feeling about something.

Tasting, touching, seeing and hearing are all examples of a sense.

If you have a feeling that danger is lurking, this is an example of a sense of danger.

noun
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To detect automatically.

Sense radioactivity.

verb
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in a sense
  • To a limited extent or degree.
  • In one aspect.
idiom
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make sense
  • To be intelligible or logical.
idiom
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make sense of
  • To find meaning in; understand.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of sense

  • Middle English meaning from Old French sens from Latin sēnsus the faculty of perceiving from past participle of sentīre to feel sent- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English sense, from Old French sens, sen, san (“sense, reason, direction"); partly from Latin sensus (“sensation, feeling, meaning"), from sentiō (“feel, perceive"); partly of Germanic origin (whence also Occitan sen, Italian senno), from Old Frankish *sinn (“reason, judgement, mental faculty, way, direction"), from Proto-Germanic *sinnaz (“mind, meaning"). Both Latin and Germanic from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (“to feel"). Compare French assener (“to thrust out"), forcené (“maniac"). More at send.
    From Wiktionary