Twig definition

twĭg
A young shoot representing the current season's growth of a woody plant.
noun
7
2
Any small, leafless branch of a woody plant.
noun
5
2
To observe or notice.
verb
6
4
To understand or figure out.
verb
6
4
To observe.
verb
3
2
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A small thin branch of a tree or bush.

They used twigs and leaves as a base to start the fire.

noun
0
0
To beat with twigs.
verb
0
0
(colloquial, regional) To realise something; to catch on.
  • 2012 May 30, John E. McIntyre, “A future for copy editors", Baltimore Sun.
    Well, with fewer people doing two or three times the work, you may have already twigged to this.

verb
0
0
To understand the meaning of (a person); to comprehend.

Do you twig me?

verb
0
0
To observe slyly; also, to perceive; to discover.
verb
0
0
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(obsolete, Scotland) To twitch; to pull; to tweak.
verb
0
0
Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster's Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
verb
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0
The definition of a twig is a small branch on a tree.

A little tree branch growing off of a larger branch is an example of a twig.

noun
0
1
To be or become aware of the situation; understand.
verb
0
1
The current style; the fashion.
noun
0
1
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A small, slender branch or shoot of a tree or shrub.
noun
0
1
To understand.
verb
0
1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
twig
Plural:
twigs

Origin of twig

  • Perhaps from Irish Gaelic tuig- stem of tuigim I understand from Old Irish tuicim

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English twigge dwo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English twigge, from Proto-Germanic *twÄ«gÄ… (compare West Frisian twiich, Dutch twijg, German Zweig), from Proto-Indo-European *dwigha (compare Old Church Slavonic [script?] (dvigÅ­, “branch"), Albanian degë 'id.'), from *dwó 'two'. More at two.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Irish and Scottish Gaelic tuig (“to understand").

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare tweak.

    From Wiktionary