Two meaning

to͝o
Two is defined as the number equal to the sum of one plus one.

An example of two is 2.

noun
12
2
Something having two parts, units, or members, especially a playing card, the face of a die, or a domino with two pips.
noun
6
2
A two-dollar bill.
noun
5
3
Totaling one more than one.
adjective
4
3
The cardinal number between one and three; 2; II.
noun
4
3
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Any two people or things; pair; couple.
noun
2
1
Something numbered two or having two units, as a playing card, domino, face of a die, etc.
noun
2
1
noun
1
1
The digit/figure 2.

The number 2202 contains three twos.

noun
1
1
(US, informal) A two-dollar bill.
noun
1
1
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A child aged two.

This toy is suitable for the twos and threes.

noun
1
1
The playing cards featuring two pips.
noun
1
1
A prefix meaning "two" or "double", same as bi-.
prefix
1
1
A prefix meaning "in two", "by two", "partially", or "half-way"

Two-blocks, two-cleft, two-forked, two-parted.

prefix
1
1
The definition of two is totaling one plus one.

An example of two used as an adjective is in the phrase "two sneakers," which means one plus one sneakers.

adjective
1
2
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The cardinal number equal to the sum of 1 + 1.
noun
1
2
The second in a set or sequence.
noun
1
2
in two
  • Into two separate parts; in half:.
    Cut the sandwich in two.
idiom
0
1
in two
  • In two parts; asunder.
idiom
0
1
put two and two together
  • To reach an obvious conclusion by considering several facts together.
idiom
0
0
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of two

  • Middle English from Old English twā dwo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English two, twa, from Old English twā (“two"), from Proto-Germanic *twai (“two"), from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁ (“two"). Cognate with Scots twa (“two"); North Frisian tou, tuu (“two"); Saterland Frisian twäin, two (“two"); West Frisian twa (“two"); Dutch twee (“two"); Low German twee, twei (“two"); German zwei, zwo (“two"); Danish to (“two"); Swedish tvÃ¥, tu (“two"); Icelandic tvö (“two"); Latin duō (“two"); Ancient Greek δύο (dýo, “two"); Irish dhá (“two"); Lithuanian dù (“two"); Russian два (dva, “two"); Albanian dy (“two"); Old Armenian Õ¥Ö€Õ¯Õ¸Ö‚ (erku, “two"); Sanskrit द्व (dvá, “two"); Tocharian A/B wu/wi (“two"). See also twain.

    From Wiktionary

  • Partly from two, and partly from an alteration (due to two) of twi- (“two-, double-, in two”), from Middle English twi-, from Old English twi- (“two-”). More at twi-.

    From Wiktionary