Deuce meaning

do͝os, dyo͝os
Frequency:
The number two.
noun
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4
(slang) Excrement.
noun
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4
A playing card with two spots.
noun
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2
Devil; dickens.

What the deuce is he doing?

noun
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(card games) A card with two spots, one of four in a standard deck of playing cards.
noun
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A tied score in tennis in which each player or side has 40 points, or 5 or more games, and one player or side must win 2 successive points to win the game, or 2 successive games to win the set.
noun
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0
The side of a die bearing two spots, or a throw of the dice totaling two.
noun
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A tie score (in tennis, 40 each, or any tie score beyond this), after which one player or side must score two successive points to win the game.
noun
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(epithet) The Devil, used in exclamations of confusion or anger.

Love is a bodily infirmity . . . which breaks out the deuce knows how or why (Thackeray)

noun
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1
(baseball) A curveball.
noun
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(dice) A side of a die with two spots.
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(dice) A cast of dice totalling two.
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(tennis) A tie, both players have the same number of points and one can win by scoring two additional points.
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In playing cards or dice, a deuce is defined as two spots. In tennis, a deuce is a tied score of 40 to 40 in a game or 5 to 5 in a set.

An example of a deuce on a playing card is the two of hearts.

noun
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To make the score of (a tennis game or set) deuce.
verb
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The devil.
noun
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An outstanding example, especially of something difficult or bad.

A deuce of a family row.

noun
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1
A severe reprimand or expression of anger.

Got the deuce for being late.

noun
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1
Used as an intensive.

What the deuce were they thinking of?

noun
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1
(restaurants) A table seating two diners.
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(custom cars) A '32 Ford in plural, 2-barrel (twin-choke) carburetors (in the term 3 deuces, an arrangement on a common intake manifold).
noun
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2

Origin of deuce

  • Middle English deus from Old French two from Latin duōs masculine accusative of duo dwo- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Low German duus a throw of two in dice games, bad luck ultimately from Latin duo two deuce1

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Compare Late Latin dusius (“phantom, specter”); Scottish Gaelic taibhs, taibhse (“apparition, ghost”); or from Old French deus (“God”), from Latin deus (compare deity.)

    From Wiktionary

  • French deux (“two”), from Old French deus, from Latin duo.

    From Wiktionary