Devil Definition

dĕvəl
deviled, deviling, devilled, devilling, devils
noun
devils
The chief evil spirit, a supernatural being subordinate to, and the foe of, God, and the tempter of human beings; Satan: typically depicted as a man with horns, a tail, and cloven feet.
Webster's New World
Any evil spirit; demon.
Webster's New World
A very wicked or malevolent person.
Webster's New World
An unlucky, unhappy person.
That poor devil.
Webster's New World
A person who is mischievous, energetic, reckless, etc.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
angelgodseraph
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pronoun

(theology) The chief devil; Satan.

Wiktionary
verb
deviled, deviling, devils
To prepare (food, often chopped food) with hot seasoning.
Deviled ham.
Webster's New World
To tear up (rags, etc.) with a special machine.
Webster's New World
To annoy; torment; tease.
Webster's New World
To make like a devil; to invest with the character of a devil.
Wiktionary

To work as a ‘devil’; to work for a lawyer or writer without fee or recognition.

Wiktionary
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idiom
between the devil and the deep blue sea
  • Between two equally unacceptable choices.
American Heritage
full of the devil
  • Very energetic, mischievous, daring, or clever.
American Heritage
give the devil his due
  • To give credit to a disagreeable or malevolent person.
American Heritage
go to the devil
  • To be unsuccessful; fail.
  • To become depraved.
American Heritage
play the devil with
  • To upset or ruin.
American Heritage
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Other Word Forms of Devil

Noun

Singular:
devil
Plural:
devils

Origin of Devil

  • From Old English dēofol, from Ancient Greek διάβολος (diabolos, “accuser, slanderer”), also as "Satan" (in Jewish/Christian usage, translating Biblical Hebrew שטן, satán), from διαβάλλω (diaballō, “to slander”), literally “to throw across”, from διά (dia, “through, across”) + βάλλω (ballō, “throw”). The Old English word was probably adopted under influence of Latin diabolus (itself from the Greek). Other Germanic languages adopted the word independently: compare Dutch duivel, Low German düvel, German Teufel, Swedish djävul (older: djefvul, Old Swedish diævul, Old Norse djǫfull).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English devel from Old English dēofol from Latin diabolus from Late Greek diabolos from Greek slanderer from diaballein to slander dia- dia- ballein to hurl gwelə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • See devil

    From Wiktionary

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