Devil meaning

dĕvəl
The definition of a devil is someone or something evil, hurtful or wicked.

An example of a devil is Satan from the Christian Bible.

An example of a devil is a tornado that causes death and wreckage.

noun
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To devil is to add hot seasonings to chopped food.

An example of devil is to add spices to chopped eggs, called "deviled eggs."

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A subordinate evil spirit; a demon.
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In many religions, the major personified spirit of evil, ruler of Hell, and foe of God. Used with the.
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A wicked or malevolent person.
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To season (food) heavily.
verb
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An energetic, mischievous, daring, or clever person.
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To annoy, torment, or harass.
verb
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To tear up (cloth or rags) in a toothed machine.
verb
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To prepare (food, often chopped food) with hot seasoning.

Deviled ham.

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A person.

A handsome devil; the poor devil.

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A printer's devil.
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A device or machine, especially one having teeth or spikes and used for tearing.
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An outstanding example, especially of something difficult or bad.

Has a devil of a temper.

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Used as an intensive.

Who the devil do you think you are?

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A very wicked or malevolent person.
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A person who is mischievous, energetic, reckless, etc.
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An unlucky, unhappy person.

That poor devil.

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Anything that is difficult or is hard to operate, control, understand, etc.
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Any of various machines for tearing things, as paper or rags, to bits.
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To tear up (rags, etc.) with a special machine.
verb
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To annoy; torment; tease.
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(theology) A creature of hell.
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(theology) (the devil or the Devil) The chief devil; Satan.
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The bad part of the conscience; the opposite to the angel.
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A wicked or naughty person, or one who harbors reckless, spirited energy, especially in a mischievous way; usually said of a young child.
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(euphemistically, with an article, as an intensifier) Hell.
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A person, especially a man; used to express a particular opinion of him, usually in the phrases poor devil and lucky devil.
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A dust devil.
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(religion, Christian Science) An evil or erring entity.
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(dialectical, in compounds) A barren, unproductive and unused area.

Devil strip.

noun
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(cooking) A dish, as a bone with the meat, broiled and excessively peppered; a grill with Cayenne pepper.
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To make like a devil; to invest with the character of a devil.
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To annoy or bother; to bedevil.
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To work as a ‘devil’; to work for a lawyer or writer without fee or recognition.
verb
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To grill with cayenne pepper; to season highly in cooking, as with pepper.
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To finely grind cooked ham or other meat with spices and condiments.
verb
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To prepare a sidedish of shelled halved boiled eggs to whose extracted yolks are added condiments and spices, which mixture then is placed into the halved whites to be served.
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(theology) The chief devil; Satan.
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A severe reprimand or expression of anger.

Gave me the devil for cutting class.

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A thing that is awkward or difficult to understand or do.
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between the devil and the deep blue sea
  • Between two equally unacceptable choices.
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full of the devil
  • Very energetic, mischievous, daring, or clever.
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give the devil his due
  • To give credit to a disagreeable or malevolent person.
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go to the devil
  • To be unsuccessful; fail.
  • To become depraved.
  • Used in the imperative to express anger or impatience.
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play the devil with
  • To upset or ruin.
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the devil take the hindmost
  • Let each person follow self-interest, leaving others to fare as they may.
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the devil to pay
  • Trouble to be faced as a result of an action:.
    There'll be the devil to pay if you allow the piglets inside the house.
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a devil of a
  • An extreme example of a.
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between the devil and the deep (blue) sea
  • Between equally unpleasant alternatives.
idiom
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give the devil his due
  • To acknowledge the ability or success of even a wicked or unpleasant person.
idiom
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go to the devil
  • To fall into bad habits; degenerate morally.
  • Go to hell!.
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play the devil with
  • To cause to go awry; upset.
idiom
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raise the devil
  • To conjure up the devil.
  • To make a commotion or have a boisterous good time.
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the devil!
  • An exclamation of anger, surprise, negation, etc.
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the devil to pay
  • Trouble as a consequence.
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Origin of devil

  • Middle English devel from Old English dēofol from Latin diabolus from Late Greek diabolos from Greek slanderer from diaballein to slander dia- dia- ballein to hurl gwelə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English dēofol, from Ancient Greek διάβολος (diabolos, “accuser, slanderer”), also as "Satan" (in Jewish/Christian usage, translating Biblical Hebrew שטן, satán), from διαβάλλω (diaballō, “to slander”), literally “to throw across”, from διά (dia, “through, across”) + βάλλω (ballō, “throw”). The Old English word was probably adopted under influence of Latin diabolus (itself from the Greek). Other Germanic languages adopted the word independently: compare Dutch duivel, Low German düvel, German Teufel, Swedish djävul (older: djefvul, Old Swedish diævul, Old Norse djǫfull).

    From Wiktionary

  • See devil

    From Wiktionary