Chafe definition

chāf
To annoy; vex.
verb
3
1
To become worn or sore from rubbing or friction.

His skin chafed where the cast had been.

verb
2
1
The definition of chafe means to rub for warmth, to the point of irritation or until worn away.

An example of chafe is the redness and pain from inner thighs rubbing together while jogging.

verb
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Warmth, wear, or soreness produced by friction.
noun
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Annoyance; vexation.
noun
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To rub so as to stimulate or make warm.
verb
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To wear away by rubbing.
verb
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To irritate or make sore by rubbing.
verb
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To annoy; irritate.
verb
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To rub (on or against)
verb
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To be or become vexed, irritated, or impatient.
verb
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An injury or irritation caused by rubbing.
noun
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(archaic) A vexed or annoyed state.
noun
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Heat excited by friction.
noun
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Injury or wear caused by friction.
noun
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Vexation; irritation of mind; rage.
noun
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To excite heat in by friction; to rub in order to stimulate and make warm.
verb
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To excite passion or anger in; to fret; to irritate.
verb
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To fret and wear by rubbing; as, to chafe a cable.
verb
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(intransitive) To rub; to come together so as to wear by rubbing; to wear by friction.
verb
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(intransitive) To be worn by rubbing.

A cable chafes.

verb
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(intransitive) To have a feeling of vexation; to be vexed; to fret; to be irritated.
verb
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To wear away or irritate by rubbing or friction.

The collar chafed my neck.

verb
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1
To warm by rubbing, as with the hands.
verb
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1
To cause irritation by rubbing or friction.

The high collar chafed against my neck.

verb
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1
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To feel irritated or impatient.

They chafed at the delay. The reporters chafed under the new restrictions.

verb
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1
chafe at the bit
  • to be impatient or vexed, as because of delay
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of chafe

  • Middle English chafen from Old French chaufer to warm from Vulgar Latin calefāre alteration of Latin calefacere calēre to be warm kelə-1 in Indo-European roots facere to make dhē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English chaufen (“to warm”), from Old French chaufer (modern French chauffer), from Latin calefacere, calfacere (“to make warm”), from calere (“to be warm”) + facere (“to make”). See caldron.

    From Wiktionary