Bother definition

bŏthər
To bewilder or fluster.
verb
7
0
To give discomfort or pain to.

A back condition that bothers her constantly.

verb
9
3
To disturb; interrupt.
verb
6
0
To intrude on without warrant or invitation; disturb.
verb
5
0
A cause or state of disturbance.
noun
6
2
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Used to express annoyance or mild irritation.
interjection
3
0
To worry or trouble, esp. with petty annoyances; harass, pester, etc.
verb
3
0
To cause discomfort to.

Her sore foot bothers her.

verb
3
0
A cause or condition of worry or irritation; trouble; fuss.
noun
3
0
A person who gives trouble.
noun
2
0
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Used to express slight annoyance, worry, etc.
interjection
2
0
To take trouble; concern oneself.
verb
2
1
To take the time and trouble; concern oneself.

Don't bother to reply.

verb
2
1
The definition of a bother is a person or condition that causes worry or trouble.

An example of a bother is a missing cat.

noun
1
0
Bother is defined as annoy, worry, or cause discomfort.

An example of bother is a little brother repeatedly pulling his sister's hair.

An example of bother is the fan of a model finding out where they live and stalking them.

An example of bother is an ingrown toe nail causing pain.

verb
1
0
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To annoy, to disturb, to irritate.

Would it bother you if I smoked?

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To feel care or anxiety; to make or take trouble; to be troublesome.

Why do I even bother to try?

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To do something which is of negligible inconvenience.

You didn't even bother to close the door.

verb
0
0

There was a bit of bother at the hairdresser's when they couldn't find my appointment in the book.

noun
0
0

Yes, I can do that for you - it's no bother.

noun
0
0
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A mild expression of annoyance.
interjection
0
0
To cause to be irritated, especially by repeated acts; trouble or annoy.
verb
0
1
To make agitated or perplexed; upset.
verb
0
1
To take the trouble (to do something); concern oneself with (accomplishing something).
verb
0
1
To make a fuss.
verb
0
1
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
bother
Plural:
bothers

Origin of bother

  • Probably from dialectal bodder possibly of Celtic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Scots bauther, bather (“to bother”). Origin unknown. Perhaps related to Scots pother (“to make a stir or commotion, bustle”), also of unknown origin.

    From Wiktionary

  • Perhaps related to Irish bodhaire (noise), bodhraim (to deafen, annoy.) {Concise Oxford English Dictionary 2011}

    From Wiktionary