Disturb meaning

dĭ-stûrb'
To break up the quiet or serenity of; agitate (what is quiet or still)
verb
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To upset mentally or emotionally; make uneasy or anxious.
verb
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To break up the settled order or orderly working of.

To disturb the books on a shelf.

verb
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To break in on; interrupt.
verb
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To inconvenience.

If I call later, will I be disturbing you?

verb
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The noisy ventilation disturbed me during the exam.

The performance was disturbed twice by a ringing mobile phone.

A school of fish disturbed the water.

verb
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To divert, redirect, or alter by disturbing.

A mudslide disturbed the course of the river.

The trauma disturbed his mind.

verb
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(intransitive) To have a negative emotional impact; to cause emotional distress or confusion.

A disturbing film that tries to explore the mind of a serial killer.

His behaviour is very disturbing.

verb
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(obsolete) Disturbance.

noun
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To disturb is defined as to interfere with something or bother someone.

When you mess up a perfect arrangement of vases and put them all out of alignment, this is an example of disturb.

When you wake up a person who is sleeping, this is an example of disturb.

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To break up or destroy the tranquility, order, or settled state of.
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To trouble emotionally or mentally; upset.

It disturbed me when you left without saying goodbye.

verb
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To alter or displace a region of (a medium) from its equilibrium state.
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Origin of disturb

  • Middle English distourben from Old French destourber from Latin disturbāre Latin dis- dis- Latin turbāre to agitate (from turba confusion) (probably from Greek turbē)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Anglo-Norman distourber, from Old French destorber, from Latin disturbare, intensifying for turbare (“to throw into disorder”).
    From Wiktionary