Solicit meaning

sə-lĭs'ĭt
To approach or accost (a person) with an offer of sex in exchange for payment.
verb
4
1
To solicit is to request or ask for something.

An example of solicit is when you ask for political donations.

verb
2
1
To make solicitation or petition for something desired.
verb
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0
To petition persistently; importune.

Solicited the neighbors for donations.

verb
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To approach or accost someone with an offer of sex in exchange for payment.
verb
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0
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To ask or seek earnestly or pleadingly; appeal to or for.

To solicit aid, to solicit members for donations.

verb
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To tempt or entice (someone) to do wrong.
verb
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To approach for some immoral purpose, as a prostitute does.
verb
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To solicit someone or something.
verb
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0
To persistently endeavor to obtain an object, or bring about an event.

To solicit alms, or a favour.

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To woo; to court.
verb
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To persuade or incite one to commit some act, especially illegal or sexual behavior.

If you want to lose your virginity, you should try to solicit some fine looking women.

verb
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To offer to perform sexual activity, especially when for a payment.

My girlfriend tried to solicit me for sex, but I was tired.

verb
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To make a petition.
verb
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(archaic) To disturb or trouble; to harass.
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To urge the claims of; to plead; to act as solicitor for or with reference to.
verb
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Dryden.

But anxious fears solicit my weak breast.

verb
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To seek to obtain by persuasion, entreaty, or formal application.

A candidate who solicited votes among the factory workers.

verb
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1
To commit the criminal offense of enticing or inciting (another) to commit an illegal act.
verb
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1

Origin of solicit

  • Middle English soliciten to disturb from Old French solliciter from Latin sollicitāre from sollicitus troubled solicitous
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle French solliciter, from Latin sollicitāre, present active participle of sollicitō (“stir, disturb; look after"), from sollicitus (“agitated, anxious, punctilious", literally “thoroughly moved"), from sollus (“whole, entire") + perfect passive participle of cieō (“shake, excite, cite, to put in motion").
    From Wiktionary