Court meaning

kôrt
Court is defined as an uncovered area partially or completely surrounded by structures.

An example of court is an outdoor area in an office park where office workers have lunch.

noun
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Court is an area dedicated for playing a specific game.

An example of court is a basketball hoop with open asphalt around it used for playing basketball.

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Court is a building or room where legal cases are heard and decided by a judge.

An example of court is where someone would go to plead their case against a traffic violation.

noun
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Court means to pay attention to someone to get something or to seek someone for marriage or dating.

An example of court is a man sending flowers to a woman he wants to take out to dinner.

verb
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An ecclesiastical court.
noun
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An open level area marked with appropriate lines, upon which a game, such as tennis, handball, or basketball, is played.
noun
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The body of directors of an organization, especially of a corporation.
noun
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A legislative assembly.
noun
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To try to gain the love or affections of, especially to seek to marry.
verb
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To attempt to gain the favor of by attention or flattery.

A salesperson courting a potential customer.

verb
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To behave so as to attract (a mate).
verb
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To pursue a courtship; woo.
verb
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To engage in courtship behavior.
verb
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A short street, often closed at one end.
noun
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A mansion or manor with a large, uncovered entrance area.

Hampton Court.

noun
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A motel.
noun
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Respectful or flattering attention paid to someone in order to get something.
noun
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Courtship; wooing.
noun
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The board of directors of a corporation.
noun
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To pay respectful or flattering attention to (a person) in order to get something.
verb
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To try to get the love of in order to marry; woo.
verb
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To try to get; seek.

To court success.

verb
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To make oneself open or liable to.

To court insults.

verb
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To engage in the instinctive behavior necessary to attracting (another) as a mate.
verb
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To carry on a courtship.
verb
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Of or fit for a court.

A court jester.

adjective
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A governmental body that adjudicates legal disputes by interpreting and applying the law to specific cases. See also trial.
noun
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The regular session of a court.
noun
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The judge or judges who sit on a court.
noun
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The building or other locale where a judge or judges adjudicate legal disputes.
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A court with jurisdiction to hear appeals from trial courts, administrative agencies, and, when there is an intermediate appellate court, lower appellate courts. See also trial court.
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A quasi-administrative, quasi-judicial federal court created by Congress under Article I of the United States Constitution to settle disputes arising from the implementation of a statutory scheme that Congress has established in the exercise of its legislative power. For example, pursuant to its power to impose and collect taxes under the United States Constitution, Congress has established the United States Tax Court to hear appeals from taxpayers who are unsatisfied with the decisions of the Internal Revenue Service. See also legislative court and Article III court.
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A federal court that is part of the judicial branch of the United States government and derives its jurisdiction from Article III of the United States Constitution. See also constitutional court and Article I court.
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In a state with a judicial system that is divided into geographical units known as circuits for the purpose of holding trials, a trial court that sits in the circuit over which its geographical jurisdiction extends. Often, the jurisdiction of such courts is limited to more serious matters (for example, felonies as opposed to misdemeanors). If the circuit encom-passes more than one county, the court may hold sessions in each county.
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In a state with a judicial system that is divided into geographical units known as circuits for the consideration of appeals on the intermediate level, an intermediate appellate court that hears appeals from the circuit over which its geographical jurisdiction extends.
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A court of the United States Court of Appeals that considers appeals of the trials conducted in those United States District Courts located within the states contained in the court’s circuit. (The United States, for the purposes of the Court of Appeals, is divided into twelve circuits. There is also the special nationwide Federal Circuit, which hears appeals from federal courts and administrative agencies other than the District Court.)
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A court that hears the trials of noncriminal cases.
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A court named or described in a state constitution or the United States Constitution that exercises the judicial power of a state or the federal government. See also Article III court and legislative court.
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A state court with jurisdiction that encompasses a single county and with powers that are determined by a state statute or constitution. In some states, a county court is an administrative, rather than a judicial, governmental body or is a mixture of both.
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An appellate court to which a case may be appealed.
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A trial or intermediate appellate court from which a case is appealed.
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See full court.
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Usually a state intermediate appellate court.
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In Maryland and New York, the highest appellate court in those states.
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See nisi prius court.
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See chancery (or chancery court).
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In some states, an intermediate court of appeal.
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See United States Court of Federal Claims.
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In some states, a trial court of general jurisdiction.
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In some states, an intermediate appellate court.
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In some states, the court of last resort for criminal actions.
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A trial court that adjudicates legal disputes primarily by applying the rules and principles of equity. Courts of equity have been merged with courts of law in most states. See also court of law.
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See court of original jurisdiction.
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A trial court with unlimited or nearly unlimited jurisdiction to hear any kind of action. See also court of limited jurisdiction.
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The court from which a particular case can be appealed no further. Usually a state’s highest appellate court or the United States Supreme Court. See also intermediate appellate court.
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A trial court that adjudicates legal disputes primarily by applying statutes and the rules and principles of the common law.
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In states where courts of equity and courts of law have been merged, any trial court that adjudicates legal disputes. See also court of equity.
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A court with jurisdiction to adjudicate only specific kinds of legal disputes (based on either the subject matter of the action or the amount of damages sought). See also court of general jurisdiction.
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An appellate court that may review decision of the Court of Military Review. For those appeals that this court declines to consider, this is the court of last resort. However, cases that are considered may be appealed to the United States Supreme Court. This court’s decisions are also subject to review by the president of the United States.
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An intermediate appellate court that reviews court-martial decisions.
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A court in which, by statute or constitutional provision, a particular type of action must be initiated and where the evidence is heard, the facts determined, and the law applied to those facts for the first time. Also called court of first instance and trial court.
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A court that is required to keep a permanent record of all conversations and statements made and non-verbal evidence produced during its proceedings by use of a stenographer or other means.
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In a state whose judicial system is divided into geographical units known as districts for the purpose of holding trials, a trial court that sits in the district over which its geographical jurisdiction extends. Often, the court’s jurisdiction is limited to one county and to less serious matters (for example, misdemeanors as opposed to felonies). See also circuit court.
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A state court with jurisdiction to adjudicate lesser offenses arising from drug use, usually with an emphasis on medical treatment and supervision rather than punishment for the drug user.
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A nongovernmental court that is part of the structure of an organized religion and adjudicates internal church issues according to church law. For centuries, such courts also had jurisdiction over matters like divorce and wills that are now within the jurisdiction of the civil courts.
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A state court with jurisdiction to adjudicate family law issues, such as divorce, child custody and visitation, child and spousal support, paternity, and domestic violence.
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An Article III court. Most actions involving federal law are tried before one of the United States District Courts. An appeal of a District Court’s decision would normally be heard first by one of the United States Court of Appeals, and then by the United States Supreme Court (the court of last resort in the federal judiciary). The Supreme Court also considers appeals of state court decisions involving questions of federal law. There are also a few specialized federal courts; see also United States Court of Federal Claims.
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In appellate litigation, a session of an appellate court where all the judges participate, typically resulting from a motion to reconsider the decision of a three judge panel. Also known as an en banc hearing.
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A court whose decision may be appealed to another court within the same judicial system, especially a court of limited, special, or statutory jurisdiction, such as a family or probate court.
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In those jurisdictions whose appellate court system is divided into two levels, the lowest appellate court, the decisions of which are subject to review by the jurisdiction’s highest appellate court. See also court of last resort.
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The principal judicial body of the United Nations whose fifteen judges usually meet at The Hague, Netherlands, to provide advisory legal opinions to the United Nations and to adjudicate legal disputes between countries who voluntarily submit cases for the court’s consideration. Abbreviated ICJ.
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A permanent international court, tentatively established by the United Nations in 1998, to investigate and adjudicate the most serious violations of international law, such as genocide and war crimes, by applying, until the adoption of an international criminal code, the general principles of international criminal law. Abbreviated ICC.
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A state court, presided over by a justice of the peace, that has jurisdiction over certain minor civil and criminal actions that arise outside the city limits of any municipality. See also municipal court.
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A state court with jurisdiction over cases involving children under eighteen years of age or another age set by the state legislature, especially one concerning cases where the child is alleged to have committed what would be an offense if done by an adult.
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A court that has no legal authority, is often self-appointed or established by criminals or vigilantes, and where few or none of the authorized and regular judicial procedures are usually followed.
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A lawful court whose procedures are so unauthorized or irregular that its proceedings are extremely improper or unfair.
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A lawful court that followed authorized and regular procedures, but is so biased against a party as to render its judgment or verdict unfair.
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A court created by a state legislature or the Congress to settle disputes arising from the implementation of a statutory scheme that the legislature or Congress has established in the exercise of their legislative powers, as opposed to a court authorized by a state constitution or the United States Constitution as part of the government’s judicial branch. See also Article I court and constitutional court.
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A state court presided over by a magistrate with jurisdiction over minor offenses and civil actions.
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A court-martial, military commission, the Court of Military Review, and the Court of Military Justice. These are not Article III courts, but courts established by Congress as a part of its power to raise and maintain a military force under the militia clause found in Article I of the United States Constitution.
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A fictitious court consisting of law professors or lawyers, before which law students and other lawyers argue moot or hypothetical cases or cases pending before a court to learn or practice oral advocacy skills and trial techniques.
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A city court with exclusive jurisdiction over violations of city ordinances and sometimes jurisdiction over certain minor civil and criminal cases that arise within the city limits. See also justice court.
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Same as court of assize and nisi prius. See nisi prius court.
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A court that, when in session, the public is allowed to attend so long as they are orderly and peaceful.
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A court that, when in session, is attended by all the parties and their lawyers. See also ex parte and in camera.
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Accomplished or conducted without litigation, without the involvement of a court, or outside a courtroom.
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A state court with jurisdiction over proceedings regarding the validity of wills, the administration and disposition of estates, and, in some states, the adoption of minors and the care, custody, guardianship, and protection of minors, incompetent individuals, and their assets. Also called surrogate court.
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A state or municipal court that has the jurisdiction to adjudicate civil actions involving very small sums of money while using informal courtroom procedures without, usually, the presence or participation of lawyers.
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In some states, a trial court of general jurisdiction.
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In some states, an intermediate appellate court.
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In most states, the court of last resort.
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In New York, a court of general jurisdiction with trial and appellate divisions.
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The court of last resort in the federal judiciary pursuant to Article III of the United States Constitution, with original jurisdiction in all cases involving ambassadors and other public ministers and consuls as well as in all cases in which a state is a party. The court also has appellate jurisdiction over all cases in federal court as well as those cases in state court involving questions of federal law. Unless it is otherwise clear, the phrase “Supreme Court” always means this court.
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See probate court.
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A state court that adjudicates disputes between the taxpayer and the state’s tax collection agency over the individual’s tax liabilities.
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An Article I court that adjudicates disputes between the taxpayer and the Internal Revenue Service over the individual’s tax deficiencies. (Disputes over the taxpayer’s claim for a refund are considered by the United States Court of Federal Claims.)
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A session of court, defined by the court’s schedule; may refer to a single session or a schedule of sessions over a period of time.
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See court of original jurisdiction.
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The intermediate appellate court in the federal judiciary that hears appeals from trials conducted by the United States District Courts and other lower federal courts and appeals of administrative decisions from some federal agencies. See also circuit court.
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An Article I court with jurisdiction to hear all claims against the United States government that are based on the United States Constitution, a federal statute or regulation, a contract with the federal government, or other cause of action not involving a tort. Formerly called the United States Claims Court.
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A federal trial court having original jurisdiction for most criminal offenses against the United States and for most of the civil matters described in the United States Constitution.
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See Supreme Court of the United States.
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(US) An abbreviated term of respect for any court ("the Court").
pronoun
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A surname​ for someone who worked or lived in a court.
pronoun
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The definition of a court is a short street that is closed at one end.

An example of court is a street without through traffic.

noun
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pay court to
  • To flatter with solicitous overtures in an attempt to obtain something or clear away antagonism.
  • To seek someone's love; woo.
idiom
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the ball is in someone's court
  • (a problem is) awaiting action or a decision by someone.
idiom
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out of court
  • Without a trial in a law court.
  • Not important enough for consideration or examination.
idiom
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pay court to
  • To court, as for favor or love.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of court

  • Middle English from Old French cort from Latin cohors cohort- courtyard, retinue gher-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition