Train meaning

trān
Train means to guide, coach or instruct.

An example of train is a coach preparing athletes for their coming game season.

verb
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A staff of people following in attendance; a retinue.
noun
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A series of connected railroad cars pulled or pushed by one or more locomotives.
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The personnel, vehicles, and equipment following and providing supplies and services to a combat unit.
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A part of a gown that trails behind the wearer.
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A line of connected railroad cars pulled or pushed by a locomotive or locomotives.
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The definition of a train is something that hangs down and trails behind.

An example of a train is the long fabric at the bottom of a wedding gown that trails behind on the floor.

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A long line of moving people, animals, or vehicles.
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A set of linked mechanical parts.

A train of gears.

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A string of gunpowder that acts as a fuse for exploding a charge.
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To coach in or accustom to a mode of behavior or performance.
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To make proficient with specialized instruction and practice.
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To prepare physically, as with a regimen.

Train athletes for track-and-field competition.

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To cause (a plant or one's hair) to take a desired course or shape, as by manipulating.
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To point or direct (a gun or camera, for example) at something.
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To let drag behind; trail.
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To give or undergo a course of training.

Trained daily for the marathon.

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To travel by railroad train.
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Something that hangs down and drags behind.
  • A part of a dress, skirt, etc. that trails.
  • The tail feathers of a bird.
    The train of a peacock.
  • A stream of something trailing behind.
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A group of persons following as attendants in a procession; retinue; suite.
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A group of persons, animals, vehicles, etc. that follow one another in a line; procession; caravan; cortege.
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The persons, vehicles, etc. carrying supplies, ammunition, food, etc. for combat troops.
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A series of events or conditions that follow some happening; aftermath.

A war bringing famine and disease in its train.

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Any connected order or arrangement; series; sequence.

A train of thought.

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A line of gunpowder, etc. that serves as a fuse for an explosive charge.
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A series of connected mechanical parts for transmitting motion.

A train of gears.

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To trail or drag.
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To guide the growth of (a plant), as by tying, pruning, etc.
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To subject to certain action, exercises, etc. in order to bring to a desired condition.

A surgeon's hand trained to be steady.

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To guide or control the mental, moral, etc. development of; bring up; rear.
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To instruct so as to make proficient or qualified.

To train nurses at a hospital.

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To prepare or make fit for an athletic contest, etc. as by exercise, diet, etc.
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To aim (a gun, binoculars, etc.) at something; bring to bear.
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To administer or undergo training.
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Elongated portion.
  • The elongated back portion of a dress or skirt (an ornamental piece of material added to similar effect), which drags along the ground. [from 14th c.].
    Unfortunately, the leading bridesmaid stepped on the bride's train as they were walking down the aisle.
  • A trail or line of something, especially gunpowder. [from 15th c.].
  • (now rare) An animal's trail or track. [from 16th c.].
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Connected sequence of people or things.
  • A group of people following an important figure, king etc.; a retinue, a group of retainers. [from 14th c.].
  • A group of animals, vehicles, or people that follow one another in a line, such as a wagon train; a caravan or procession. [from 15th c.].
    Our party formed a train at the funeral parlor before departing for the burial.
  • A sequence of events or ideas which are interconnected; a course or procedure of something. [from 15th c.].
  • (military) The men and vehicles following an army, which carry artillery and other equipment for battle or siege. [from 16th c.].
  • A set of interconnected mechanical parts which operate each other in sequence. [from 18th c.].
  • A series of electrical pulses. [from 19th c.].
  • A series of specified vehicles, originally tramcars in a mine, and later especially railway carriages, coupled together. [from 19th c.].
  • A line of connected railway cars or carriages considered overall as a mode of transport; (as uncountable noun) rail travel. [from 19th c.].
    The train will pull in at midday.
  • (sex, slang) An act wherein series of men line up and then penetrate a woman or bottom, especially as a form of gang rape. [from 20th c.].
noun
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(intransitive) To practice an ability.

She trained seven hours a day to prepare for the Olympics.

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To teach and form by practice; to educate; to exercise with discipline.

You can't train a pig to write poetry.

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(intransitive) To improve one's fitness.

I trained with weights all winter.

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verb
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To move (a gun) laterally so that it points in a different direction.

The assassin had trained his gun on the minister.

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(horticulture) To encourage (a plant or branch) to grow in a particular direction or shape, usually by pruning and bending.

The vine had been trained over the pergola.

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(mining) To trace (a lode or any mineral appearance) to its head.
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(video games) To create a trainer for; to apply cheats to (a game).
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Shakespeare.

O, train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note.

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Ford.

This feast, I'll gage my life, / Is but a plot to train you to your ruin.

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(obsolete) Treachery; deceit. [14th-19th c.]
noun
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(obsolete) A trick or stratagem. [14th-19th c.]
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(obsolete) A trap for animals; a snare. [14th-18th c.]
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(obsolete) A lure; a decoy. [15th-18th c.]
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Train is defined as a line of railroad cars attached and pulled or pushed by a locomotive.

An example of a train is what someone would ride in while traveling Amtrak on the railroad tracks.

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Origin of train

  • Middle English trailing part of a gown from Old French from trainer to drag from Vulgar Latin tragīnāre from tragere to pull back-formation from tractus past participle of Latin trahere
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old French train (“a delay, a drawing out"), from trainer (“to pull out, to draw"), from Vulgar Latin *tragināre, from *tragere, from Latin trahere (“to pull, to draw"). The verb was derived from the noun in Middle English.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Anglo-Norman traine, Middle French traïne, from traïr (“to betray").
    From Wiktionary