Trail meaning

trāl
The definition of a trail is a marked, paved or beaten path or course.

An example of trail is a pathway that deer take through the forest.

noun
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2
Trail is defined as to drag, pull, follow or lag behind someone or something.

An example of trail is to walk behind someone.

verb
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1
To drag (the body, for example) wearily or heavily.
verb
2
1
To walk or proceed with dragging steps; trudge.

Trailed along in glum silence.

verb
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0
To follow behind.

Several cruisers trailed by an escorting destroyer.

verb
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To lag behind (an opponent).

Trailed the league leader by four games.

verb
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To drag or be dragged along, brushing the ground.

The queen's long robe trailed behind.

verb
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To extend, grow, or droop loosely over a surface.

Vines trailing through the garden.

verb
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To drift in a thin stream.

Smoke trailing from a dying fire.

verb
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To become gradually fainter; dwindle.

His voice trailed off in confusion.

verb
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To be behind in competition; lag.

Trailing by two goals in the second period.

verb
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Something that is drawn along or follows behind; a train.

The mayor was followed by a trail of reporters.

noun
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A succession of things that come afterward or are left behind.

Left a trail of broken promises.

noun
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Something that hangs loose and long.

Trails of ticker tape floated down from office windows.

noun
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The part of a gun carriage that rests or slides on the ground.
noun
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The act of trailing.
noun
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To follow the tracks of; track.
verb
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To hunt by tracking.
verb
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(mil.) To carry (a rifle, etc.) in the right hand with the arm extended downward so that the muzzle is tilted forward and the butt is near the ground.
verb
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To hang down, esp. behind, so as to drag on the ground, etc.
verb
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To grow so long as to extend along the ground, over rocks, etc.
verb
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To extend in an irregular line; straggle.
verb
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To flow behind in a long, thin stream, wisp, etc.

Smoke trailed from the chimney.

verb
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To move, walk, go along, etc. wearily, heavily, or slowly; crawl; drag.
verb
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To track game.
verb
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To grow gradually weaker, dimmer, less direct, etc.
verb
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Something that trails or is trailed behind.
noun
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A mark, footprint, scent, etc. left by a person, animal, or thing that has passed.
noun
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To follow behind (someone or something); to tail (someone or something).

The hunters trailed their prey deep into the woods.

verb
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To drag (something) behind on the ground.

You'll get your coat all muddy if you trail it around like that.

verb
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To leave (a trail of).

He walked into the house, soaking wet, and trailed water all over the place.

verb
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To show a trailer of (a film, TV show etc.); to release or publish a preview of (a report etc.) in advance of the full publication.

His new film was trailed on TV last night.

There were no surprises in this morning's much-trailed budget statement.

verb
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To be losing, to be behind in a competition.
verb
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(military) To carry (a firearm) with the breech near the ground and the upper part inclined forward, the piece being held by the right hand near the middle.
verb
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To flatten (grass, etc.) by walking through it; to tread down.

verb
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(dated) To take advantage of the ignorance of; to impose upon.
verb
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The track or indication marking the route followed by something that has passed, such as the footprints of animal on land or the contrail of an airplane in the sky.
noun
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A route for travel over land, especially a narrow, unpaved pathway for use by hikers, horseback riders, etc.
noun
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A trailer broadcast on television for a forthcoming film or programme.
noun
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A city in British Columbia.
pronoun
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A city in Minnesota.
pronoun
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To allow to drag or stream behind, as along the ground.

The dog ran off, trailing its leash.

verb
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1

Origin of trail

  • Middle English trailen probably from Old French trailler to hunt without a foreknown course from Vulgar Latin trāgulāre to make a deer double back and forth perhaps alteration (influenced by Latin trāgula dragnet) of Latin trahere to pull, draw

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin trahere, to drag along

    From Wiktionary