Track meaning

trăk
To follow the tracks of; trail.

Tracking game through the forest.

verb
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To move in relation to a subject being filmed. Used of a camera or camera crew.
verb
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A path or circuit laid out for running, horse racing, etc.
noun
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To follow a course; travel.

The storm is tracking up the coast.

verb
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A beaten path or trail left by the repeated passage of persons, animals, or vehicles.
noun
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Any of the courses of study continuing through succeeding grades in an educational structure (tracking), arranged according to various levels of mastery, to which students are assigned on the basis of test performance, abilities, needs, etc.
noun
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A pair of parallel metal rails, with their crossties, etc., on which trains, streetcars, etc. run.
noun
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The distance between the centers of the tread of parallel wheels, as of an automobile.
noun
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Either of the two endless belts with which tanks, some tractors, etc. are equipped for moving over rough ground.
noun
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The tread of an automobile tire.
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To plot the path of and record data from (an aircraft, spacecraft, missile, etc.) using radar, a telescope, etc.
verb
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To tread or travel.
verb
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To provide with tracks or rails.
verb
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To follow (a moving object or person) with a moving camera.
verb
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To run in the same (width) track.
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To be in alignment, as gears, wheels, or the stylus of a phonograph cartridge with a groove on a record.
verb
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To have a (specified) width between the wheels.

A narrow-gauge car tracks less than 56 inches.

verb
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To track a moving object.
verb
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(1) A single song or musical composition on a CD or as a download. See online music store.
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A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.
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A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or beast; trace; vestige; footprint.
noun
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The entire lower surface of the foot; said of birds, etc.
noun
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A road; a beaten path.
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Course; way; as, the track of a comet.
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A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.
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(railways) The permanent way; the rails.
noun
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A tract or area, as of land.
noun
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(automotive) The distance between two opposite wheels on a same axletree (also track width)
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(automotive) Short for caterpillar track.
noun
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(cricket) The pitch.
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Sound stored on a record.
noun
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The physical track on a record.
noun
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(music) A song or other relatively short piece of music, on a record, separated from others by a short silence.
noun
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Circular (never-ending) data storage unit on a side of magnetic or optical disk, divided into sectors.
noun
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(uncountable, sports) The racing events of track and field; track and field in general.

I'm going to try out for track next week.

noun
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A session talk on a conference.
noun
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To observe the (measured) state of an object over time.
verb
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To monitor the movement of a person or object.
verb
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To discover the location of a person or object (usually in the form track down).
verb
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To follow the tracks of.

My uncle spent all day tracking the deer.

verb
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To leave in the form of tracks.

In winter, my cat tracks mud all over the house.

verb
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To track is to monitor the progress of something, to follow behind something or to try to find something.

An example of track is when you chart your weight.

An example of track is when you follow behind an animal when hunting to try to find the animal.

An example of track is when you search for a criminal.

verb
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The definition of a track is a specific area on which something is to take place or that has been designed for a specific purpose, like for a train to run along it or for runners to run on.

An example of a track is a railroad track that a train runs along.

An example of a track is a paved area meant for runners to run on.

noun
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A succession of ideas; a train of thought.
noun
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A rail or set of parallel rails upon which railroad cars or other vehicles run.
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The boundary, formerly often delineated by train tracks, that separates two neighborhoods of different social class.

Grew up on the wrong side of the tracks.

noun
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A metal groove or ridge that holds, guides, and reduces friction for a moving device or apparatus.
noun
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Any of several courses of study to which students are assigned according to ability, achievement, or needs.

Academic, vocational, and general tracks.

noun
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Needle marks on the skin from multiple intravenous injections, considered an indication of habitual drug use.
noun
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A mark or series of marks or other discoverable evidence left by a person, animal, or thing that has passed, as a footprint, wheel rut, wake of a boat, etc.
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A trace or vestige.
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A path along which something moves; a course.

Following the track of an airplane on radar.

noun
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Awareness of something occurring or passing.

Keeping track of the score; lost all track of time.

noun
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Either of the continuous metal belts with which vehicles such as bulldozers and tanks move over the ground.
noun
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To equip with a track.
verb
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To assign (a student) to a curricular track.
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A sequence of ideas, events, etc.; succession.
noun
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noun
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To trace by means of vestiges, evidence, etc.
verb
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To assign to a track.
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in (one's) tracks
  • Exactly where one is standing:.
    Stopped him right in his tracks.
idiom
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dead in one's tracks
  • Abruptly, as from being stunned or otherwise rendered unable to proceed.
    His insult stopped me in my tracks.
idiom
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keep track of
  • To keep an account of; stay informed about.
idiom
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lose track of
  • To fail to keep informed about; lose sight or knowledge of.
idiom
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make tracks
  • To proceed or depart hurriedly.
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on (or off) the track
  • Keeping to (or straying from) the subject, objective, or goal.
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the wrong side of the tracks
  • That part of a community where those considered socially and culturally inferior live.
idiom
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track down
  • To pursue until caught, as by following tracks.
  • To investigate fully or search for until found.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

dead in one's tracks
keep track of
lose track of
on (<i>or</i> off) the track
the wrong side of the tracks

Origin of track

  • Middle English trak from Old French trac perhaps of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • (noun) From Old French trac (French: traque), from a Germanic source akin to Old Norse traðk "trodden place, track" (norw. trakke "to trample"), Dutch: trek, Middle Low German: treck.

    From Wiktionary