Rail meaning

rāl
The definition of a rail is a bar that is a barrier or offers support, or a piece of fencing.

An example of a rail is a piece of wood on the top of crib bars.

An example of a rail is the fence surrounding a ranch.

noun
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Rail is defined as to speak or act bitterly or hatefully against.

An example of to rail is to give an inflamed speech about a new company policy.

verb
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Rail means relating to trains.

An example of rail used as an adjective is in the phrase "rail car" which means a train car.

adjective
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A steel bar used, usually in pairs, as a track for railroad cars or other wheeled vehicles.
noun
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A grind rail.
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The railroad as a means of transportation.

Goods transported by rail.

noun
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A horizontal framing member in a door or in paneling.
noun
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To supply or enclose with rails or a rail.
verb
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Any of various marsh birds of the family Rallidae, found worldwide and characteristically having brownish plumage and short wings.
noun
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To express objections or criticisms in bitter, harsh, or abusive language.
verb
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A bar of wood, metal, etc. placed horizontally between upright posts to serve as a barrier or support.
noun
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A fence or railing; specif., the fence surrounding the infield of a racetrack.
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Any of a series of parallel metal bars laid upon crossties or in the ground to make a track for railroad cars, streetcars, etc.
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A railroad or railway as a means of transportation.

To travel by rail.

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A horizontal piece of wood separating the panels in doors or wainscoting.
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The rim of a billiard table.
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A narrow, wooden or metal piece forming the top of a ship's bulwarks.
noun
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To supply with rails or a railing; fence.
verb
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Of or pertaining to a railway or railroad.
adjective
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To speak bitterly or reproachfully; complain violently.
verb
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Any of a number of gruiform marsh birds (family Rallidae), characterized by short wings and tail, long toes, and a harsh cry.
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(1) See The Rail and Ruby.
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A horizontal bar extending between supports and used for support or as a barrier; a railing.
noun
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The metal bar that makes the track for a railroad.
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A horizontal piece of wood that serves to separate sections of a door or window.
noun
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(surfing) One of the lengthwise edges of a surfboard.
noun
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(intransitive) To travel by railway.
verb
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To enclose with rails or a railing.
verb
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To range in a line.
verb
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Any of several birds in the family Rallidae.
noun
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To complain violently (against, about).
verb
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(obsolete) An item of clothing; a cloak or other garment.
noun
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(obsolete) Specifically, a woman's headscarf or neckerchief.

noun
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1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.2.

So furiously each other did assayle, / As if their soules they would attonce haue rent / Out of their brests, that streames of bloud did rayle / Adowne, as if their springes of life were spent [...].

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(go) off the rails
  • (to go) off the proper course.
  • (to become) insane.
idiom
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ride on a rail
  • To place on a rail and carry out of the community: extralegal punishment in which the victim was usually tarred and feathered beforehand.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

(go) off the rails

Origin of rail

  • Middle English railen from Old French railler to tease, joke from Old Provençal ralhar to chat, joke from Vulgar Latin ragulāre to bray from Late Latin ragere
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English raile from Old French raale perhaps from Old French raler, racler to scrape from Old Provençal rasclar raclette
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English raile from Old French reille from Latin rēgula straight piece of wood, ruler reg- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • French râle, Old French rasle. Compare Medieval Latin rallus. Named from its harsh cry, Vulgar Latin *rasculum, from Latin rādere (“to scrape").
    From Wiktionary
  • Old French reille, Latin regula (“rule, bar"), from regere (“to rule, to guide, to govern"); see regular.
    From Wiktionary
  • Probably from Anglo-Norman raier, Middle French raier.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle French railler.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English hræġl.
    From Wiktionary