Course definition

kôrs
A systematic or orderly succession; a sequence.

A course of medical treatments.

noun
17
9
A continuous layer of building material, such as brick or tile, on a wall or roof of a building.
noun
16
8
The direction taken, esp. that taken or to be taken by a ship or plane, expressed in degrees measured clockwise from north or by points of the compass.
noun
8
0
A way, path, or channel of movement.
  • The path to be followed by participants in a race.
noun
6
2
To run or chase after; pursue.
verb
5
2
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A part of a meal served at one time.

The main course was roast beef.

noun
3
1
An onward movement; going on from one point to the next; progress.
noun
2
0
The progress or duration of time.

In the course of a week.

noun
2
0
A way of behaving; mode of conduct.

Our wisest course.

noun
2
0
To move swiftly through or over; traverse.

Ships coursing the seas.

verb
2
1
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To hunt (game) with hounds.
verb
2
1
A series of like things in some regular order.
noun
2
1
The definition of course is a class you take in school to study a particular subject.

An example of a course is a business law class.

noun
2
2
Course is defined as a specific path that something follows or the way in which something develops.

An example of course is the route taken by an airplane.

An example of course is the way your life progresses.

noun
0
0
A part of a meal served as a unit at one time.

The first course was a delicious soup.

noun
0
0
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(nautical) The lowest sail on a mast of a square-rigged ship.
noun
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A point on the compass, especially the one toward which a vehicle, such as a ship, is moving.
noun
0
0
Development in a particular way; progress.

The course of events.

noun
0
0
Movement in time; duration.

In the course of a year.

noun
0
0
The direction of continuing movement.

The boat took a northern course.

noun
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0
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The route or path taken by something that moves, such as a stream or vehicle.
noun
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0
A designated route or area on which a race is held.

The course of a marathon.

noun
0
0
A complete body of prescribed studies constituting a curriculum.

A four-year course in engineering.

noun
0
0
A unit of such a curriculum.

Took an introductory course in chemistry; passed her calculus course.

noun
0
0
To set (hounds) to chase game.
verb
0
0
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To proceed or move swiftly in a certain direction or along a course.
verb
0
0
To hunt game with hounds.
verb
0
0
A horizontal row or layer, as of bricks in a wall or shingles on a roof.
noun
0
0
(naut.) A sail on any of the lowest yards of a square-rigged ship.
noun
0
0
A regular manner of procedure.

The law must take its course.

noun
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0
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A particular succession of events or actions.
noun
0
0
A complete series of studies leading to graduation or a degree.
noun
0
0
Any of the separate units of instruction in a subject, made up of recitations, lectures, etc.
noun
0
0
To cause (esp. hunting hounds) to chase.
verb
0
0
To run through or over; traverse.
verb
0
0
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To move swiftly; run or race.
verb
0
0
  • A normal or customary sequence.
  • A programme, a chosen manner of proceeding.
  • Any ordered process or sequence or steps.
  • A learning program, as in a school.
    I need to take a French course.
  • (especially in medicine) A treatment plan.
  • A stage of a meal.
    We offer seafood as the first course.
  • The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.

The normal course of events seems to be just one damned thing after another.

noun
0
0
A path that something or someone moves along.
  • The itinerary of a race.
    The cross-country course passes the canal.
  • The path taken by a flow of water; a watercourse.
  • (sports) The trajectory of a ball, frisbee etc.
  • (golf) A golf course.
  • (nautical) The direction of movement of a vessel at any given moment.
    The ship changed its course 15 degrees towards south.
  • (navigation) The intended passage of voyage, such as a boat, ship, airplane, spaceship, etc.
    A course was plotted to traverse the ocean.

His illness ran its course.

noun
0
0
(nautical) The lowest square sail in a fully rigged mast, often named according to the mast.

Main course and mainsail are the same thing in a sailing ship.

noun
0
0
A row or file of objects.
  • (masonry) A row of bricks or blocks.
    On a building that size, two crews could only lay two courses in a day.
  • (roofing) A row of material that forms the roofing, waterproofing or flashing system.
  • (textiles) In weft knitting, a single row of loops connecting the loops of the preceding and following rows.
noun
0
0
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(music) A string on a lute.
noun
0
0
(music) A pair of strings played together in some musical instruments, like the vihuela.
noun
0
0
To run or flow (especially of liquids and more particularly blood).

The oil coursed through the engine.

Blood pumped around the human body courses throughout all its veins and arteries.

verb
0
0
To run through or over.
verb
0
0
To pursue by tracking or estimating the course taken by one's prey; to follow or chase after.
verb
0
0
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To cause to chase after or pursue game.

To course greyhounds after deer.

verb
0
0
(colloquial) Alternative form of of course.
adverb
0
0
Contraction of of course.
adverb
0
0
A mode of action or behavior.

Followed the best course and invested her money.

noun
0
1
A typical, natural, or customary manner of proceeding or developing.

A fad that ran its course.

noun
0
1
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Regular or natural order or development.

The course of true love.

noun
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1
An encounter of knights contesting in a tournament.
noun
0
1
off course
  • Away from the planned or intended course.
idiom
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0
in due course
  • At the proper or right time:
    Things will get better in due course.
idiom
0
0
of course
  • As is to be expected under the circumstances; naturally or obviously:
    Of course someone had to clean up the mess.
  • Used to indicate assent or agreement:
    “Do you like her music?” “Of course!”.
idiom
0
0
on course
  • Following the planned or intended course.
idiom
0
0
run
  • To follow its natural progression or development:
    Should we let the illness run its course?.
idiom
0
0
in due course
  • in the usual or proper sequence (of events)
idiom
0
0
in the course of
  • in the progress or process of; during
idiom
0
0
of course
  • as is or was to be expected; naturally
  • certainly; without doubt
idiom
0
0
on (or off) course
  • moving (or not moving) in the intended direction
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
course
Plural:
courses

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of course

  • Middle English from Old French cours from Latin cursus from past participle of currere to run kers- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French cours, from Latin cursus (“course of a race”), from currō (“run”).

    From Wiktionary