Discipline meaning

dĭs'ə-plĭn
Training expected to produce a specific character or pattern of behavior, especially training that produces moral or mental improvement.

Was raised in the strictest discipline.

noun
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4
Discipline is defined as a field of study or is training to fix incorrect behavior or create better skills.

An example of discipline is American literature.

An example of discipline is a time out for a child who has just pushed his sibling.

noun
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7
A branch of knowledge or teaching.

The discipline of mathematics.

noun
7
2
The result of such training or control.
  • Self-control or orderly conduct.
  • Acceptance of or submission to authority and control.
noun
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A set of rules or methods, as those regulating the practice of a church or monastic order.
noun
5
2
Punishment intended to correct or train.

Subjected to harsh discipline.

noun
4
0
A branch of knowledge or learning.
noun
4
1
Treatment that corrects or punishes.
noun
4
2
The definition of discipline is to punish someone for their behavior.

An example of discipline is to give detention to a student who keeps talking during lectures.

verb
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3
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To train by instruction and practice, as in following rules or developing self-control.

The sergeant disciplined the recruits to become soldiers.

verb
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noun
3
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To punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience.
verb
3
1
To subject to discipline; train; control.
verb
3
1
A system of rules, as for a church or monastic order.
noun
2
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To punish.
verb
2
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A state of order based on submission to authority.
noun
2
0
A punishment to train or maintain control.
noun
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noun
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noun
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noun
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A category in which a certain art, sport or other activity belongs.
noun
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To train someone by instruction and practice.
verb
1
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To teach someone to obey authority.
verb
1
0
To impose order on someone.
verb
1
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To impose order on.

Needed to discipline their study habits.

verb
1
1
To punish someone in order to (re)gain control.
verb
1
1
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Origin of discipline

  • Middle English from Old French descepline from Latin disciplīna from discipulus pupil disciple
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French descipline, from Latin disciplina (“instruction”) and discipulus (“pupil”), from discere (“to learn”), from Proto-Indo-European *dek- (“(cause to) accept”).
    From Wiktionary