Tutor meaning

to͝otər, tyo͝o-
To tutor is to give someone personalized instruction.

An example of tutor is to work with a student in math.

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The definition of a tutor is a personal teacher, a teaching assistant or someone who helps a student catch up in a subject.

An example of a tutor is someone who teaches a teenage celebrity.

An example of a tutor is a teacher who assists a college professor with their teaching duties.

An example of a tutor is an expert in writing who helps a student who is struggling with English class.

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A teacher or teaching assistant in some universities and colleges having a rank lower than that of an instructor.
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A graduate, usually a fellow, responsible for the supervision of an undergraduate at some British universities.
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The guardian of a minor.
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To act as a tutor to; instruct or teach privately.
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To have the guardianship, tutelage, or care of.
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To function as a tutor.
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To be instructed by a tutor; study under a tutor.
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A legal guardian of a minor.
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In English universities, a college official in charge of the studies of an undergraduate.
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In some American universities and colleges, a teacher ranking below an instructor; teaching assistant.
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To act as a tutor to; teach; esp., to give individual instruction to.
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To train under discipline; discipline; admonish.
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To act as a tutor, or instructor.
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To be instructed, esp. by a tutor.
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One who teaches another (usually called a student, learner, or tutee) in a one-on-one or small-group interaction.

He passed the difficult class with help from his tutor.

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(UK) A university officer responsible for students in a particular hall.
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To instruct or teach, especially to an individual or small group.

To help pay her tuition, the college student began to tutor high school students in calculus and physics.

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Origin of tutor

  • Middle English tutour from Old French from Latin tūtor from tūtus variant past participle of tuērī to guard

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English tutour, from Old French tuteur (French tuteur), from Latin tutor (“a watcher, protector, guardian"), from tuÄ“ri (“to protect"); see tuition.

    From Wiktionary