School meaning

sko͝ol
The definition of a school is a place or building used for instruction, learning and education.

An example of school is UCLA - University of California at Los Angeles.

noun
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15
School means to train, educate, teach or discipline someone or something.

An example of school is training a dog.

verb
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11
School is defined as a large number of marine animals of the same kind which are swimming or feeding together.

An example of school is a group of sardines.

noun
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16
A session of instruction.

School will start in three weeks. He had to stay after school today.

noun
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13
(australian) A group of people gathered together for gambling.
noun
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The process of being educated formally, especially education constituting a planned series of courses over a number of years.

The children were put to school at home. What do you plan to do when you finish school?

noun
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2
To train or discipline.

She is well schooled in literature.

verb
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3
To educate in or as if in a school.
verb
5
3
An institution for the instruction of children or people under college age.
noun
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4
To train or discipline.

She is well schooled in literature.

verb
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Of or relating to school or education in schools.

School supplies; a school dictionary.

adjective
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3
Close-order drill instructions or exercises for military units or personnel.
noun
3
3
(slang) To defeat or put down decisively, especially in a humiliating manner.

Our team got schooled by the worst team in the division.

verb
3
4
To swim in or form into a school.
verb
2
0
A place or institution for teaching and learning; establishment for education.
  • An institution for teaching children.
  • A place for training and instruction in some special field, skill, etc.
    A dancing school.
  • A college or university.
  • In the Middle Ages, a seminary of logic, metaphysics, and theology.
noun
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To educate in or as if in a school.
verb
2
3
The building or buildings, classrooms, laboratories, etc. of any such establishment.
noun
1
1
All the students, or pupils, and teachers at any such establishment.
noun
1
1
Of the Schoolmen (see schoolman.
adjective
1
1
(australian) A group of people gathered together for gambling.
noun
1
5
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To move together in a school, as fish, whales, etc.
verb
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A group of fish or a group of marine mammals such as porpoises, dolphins, or whales.

The divers encountered a huge school of mackerel.

noun
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A multitude.
noun
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(of fish) To form into, or travel in a school.
verb
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(US, Canada) An institution dedicated to teaching and learning; an educational institution.

Our children attend a public school in our neighborhood.

Harvard University is a famous American postsecondary school.

noun
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(UK) An educational institution providing primary and secondary education, prior to tertiary education (college or university).
noun
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Within a larger educational institution, an organizational unit, such as a department or institute, which is dedicated to a specific subject area.

We are enrolled in the same university, but I attend the School of Economics and my brother is in the School of Music.

noun
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0
(considered collectively) The followers of a particular doctrine; a particular way of thinking or particular doctrine; a school of thought.
  • Jeremy Taylor.
    Let no man be less confident in his faith [...] by reason of any difference in the several schools of Christians.

These economists belong to the monetarist school.

noun
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The time during which classes are attended or in session in an educational institution.

I'll see you after school.

noun
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The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honours are held.
noun
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The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age.

He was a gentleman of the old school.

noun
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See also school.
hyponyms
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To educate, teach, or train (often, but not necessarily, in a school.)

Many future prime ministers were schooled in Eton.

verb
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verb
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To control, or compose, one's expression.

She took care to school her expression, not giving away any of her feelings.

verb
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0
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Close-order drill instructions or exercises for military units or personnel.
noun
0
1
(slang) To defeat or put down decisively, especially in a humiliating manner.

Our team got schooled by the worst team in the division.

verb
0
1
Of or relating to school or education in schools.

School supplies; a school dictionary.

adjective
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1
A large group of aquatic animals, especially fish, swimming together; a shoal.
noun
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1
Any situation, set of circumstances, or experience through which one gains knowledge, training, or discipline.

The school of hard knocks.

noun
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1
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A particular division of an institution of learning, esp. of a university.

The school of law.

noun
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1
A way of life; style of customs, manners, etc.

A gentleman of the old school.

noun
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1
To train, as at school; teach; instruct; educate.
verb
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1
To discipline or control.

Schooled herself in composure.

verb
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1
(archaic) To reprimand.
verb
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1
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Of a school or schools.
adjective
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1
A large number of fish or water animals of the same kind swimming or feeding together.
noun
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1
An institution for the instruction of children or people under college age.
noun
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2
An institution for instruction in a skill or business.

A secretarial school; a karate school.

noun
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2
An institution for instruction in a skill or business.

A secretarial school; a karate school.

noun
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2
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The process of being educated formally, especially education constituting a planned series of courses over a number of years.

The children were put to school at home. What do you plan to do when you finish school?

noun
0
2
The period of instruction at any such establishment; regular session of teaching.

The date when school begins.

noun
0
2
A session of instruction.

School will start in three weeks. He had to stay after school today.

noun
0
3

Origin of school

  • Middle English scole from Old English scōl from Latin schola, scola from Greek skholē segh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English scole from Old English scōl from Latin schola, scola from Greek skholē segh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English scole from Middle Dutch skel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English scole, from Old English scōl (“place of education"), from Proto-Germanic *skōla (“school"), from Late Latin schola, scola (“learned discussion or dissertation, lecture, school"), from Ancient Greek σχολεῖον (scholeion), from σχολή (scholÄ“, “spare time, leisure", later, "conversations and the knowledge gained through them during free time; the places where these conversations took place"), from Proto-Indo-European *seǵhe-, *sǵhÄ“- (“to hold, have, possess"). Cognate with Old Frisian skÅ«le, schÅ«le (Dutch school, “school"), Old High German scuola (German Schule, “school"), Old Norse skōli (Danish skole, “school"). Influenced in some senses by Middle English schole (“group of persons, host, company"), from Middle Dutch scole (“multitude, troop, band"). See school1. Related also to Old High German sigi (German Sieg, “victory"), Old English siÄ¡e, sigor (“victory").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English schole (“group of persons, multitude, host, school of fish"), from Middle Dutch scole (Dutch school, “multitude, troop of people, swarm of animals"), from Old Saxon scola, skola (“troop, multitude"), from Proto-Germanic *skulō (“crowd"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kÊ·el- (“crowd, people"). Cognate with Middle Low German schōle (“multitude, troop"), Old English scolu (“troop or band of people, host, multitude, school of fish"). More at shoal.

    From Wiktionary