School Definition

sko͝ol
schooled, schooling, schools
noun
schools
An institution for the instruction of children or people under college age.
American Heritage
A place or institution for teaching and learning; establishment for education.
Webster's New World
The process of formal training and instruction at a school; formal education; schooling.
Webster's New World
Attendance at a school.
To miss school for a week.
Webster's New World
An institution within or associated with a college or university that gives instruction in a specialized field and recommends candidates for degrees.
American Heritage
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verb
schooled, schooling, schools
To train, as at school; teach; instruct; educate.
Webster's New World
To move together in a school, as fish, whales, etc.
Webster's New World
To swim in or form into a school.
American Heritage
To discipline or control.
Schooled herself in composure.
Webster's New World
To defeat or put down decisively, especially in a humiliating manner.
Our team got schooled by the worst team in the division.
American Heritage
Antonyms:
learn
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adjective
Of a school or schools.
Webster's New World
Of or relating to school or education in schools.
School supplies; a school dictionary.
American Heritage

Of the Schoolmen (see schoolman.

Webster's New World
other
See also school.
Wiktionary

Other Word Forms of School

Noun

Singular:
school
Plural:
schools

Origin of School

  • From Middle English scole, from Old English scōl (“place of education"), from Proto-Germanic *skōla (“school"), from Late Latin schola, scola (“learned discussion or dissertation, lecture, school"), from Ancient Greek σχολεῖον (scholeion), from σχολή (scholÄ“, “spare time, leisure", later, "conversations and the knowledge gained through them during free time; the places where these conversations took place"), from Proto-Indo-European *seǵhe-, *sǵhÄ“- (“to hold, have, possess"). Cognate with Old Frisian skÅ«le, schÅ«le (Dutch school, “school"), Old High German scuola (German Schule, “school"), Old Norse skōli (Danish skole, “school"). Influenced in some senses by Middle English schole (“group of persons, host, company"), from Middle Dutch scole (“multitude, troop, band"). See school1. Related also to Old High German sigi (German Sieg, “victory"), Old English siÄ¡e, sigor (“victory").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English schole (“group of persons, multitude, host, school of fish"), from Middle Dutch scole (Dutch school, “multitude, troop of people, swarm of animals"), from Old Saxon scola, skola (“troop, multitude"), from Proto-Germanic *skulō (“crowd"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kÊ·el- (“crowd, people"). Cognate with Middle Low German schōle (“multitude, troop"), Old English scolu (“troop or band of people, host, multitude, school of fish"). More at shoal.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English scole from Old English scōl from Latin schola, scola from Greek skholē segh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English scole from Old English scōl from Latin schola, scola from Greek skholē segh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English scole from Middle Dutch skel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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