Cultivate definition

kŭltə-vāt
To grow or tend (a plant or crop).
verb
29
10
To promote the growth of (a biological culture).
verb
20
6
To grow (plants, crops, etc.)
verb
14
1
To encourage or foster.

Cultivate a respect for the law.

verb
15
6
To improve or develop (plants) by various horticultural techniques.
verb
7
1
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To seek to develop familiarity with; give one's attention to; pursue.
verb
7
2
To break up the surface soil around (plants) in order to destroy weeds, prevent crusting, and preserve moisture.
verb
6
2
To improve by care, training, or study; refine.

To cultivate one's mind.

verb
5
2
To promote the development or growth of; acquire and develop.

To cultivate a taste for music.

verb
6
4
To cultivate is designed as to prepare land to grow something or to nurture and cause growth, either literally or figuratively.

An example of cultivate is when you prepare land to farm on it.

An example of cultivate is when you cause carrots to grow.

An example of cultivate is when you work to create a friendship and help that friendship grow.

An example of cultivate is when you decide to learn about wine so you can expand your appreciation for it and learn to more deeply enjoy the taste of it.

verb
1
0
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To seek the acquaintance or goodwill of; make friends with.

Cultivated the club's new members.

verb
1
0
To improve and prepare (land), as by plowing or fertilizing, for raising crops; till.
verb
1
0
To loosen or dig soil around (growing plants).
verb
1
0
To grow plants, notably crops.

Farmers should cultivate their crops to get a good harvest.

verb
1
0
To nurture; to foster; to tend.

They tried to cultivate an interest in learning among their students.

verb
1
0
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To turn or stir soil in preparation for planting.
verb
1
0
To acquire, develop, or refine, as by education.

Cultivating a posh accent.

verb
3
3
To prepare and use (soil or land) for growing crops; till.
verb
3
3

Origin of cultivate

  • Medieval Latin cultīvāre cultīvāt- from cultīvus tilled from Latin cultus past participle of colere to till kwel-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Medieval Latin cultivātus, perfect passive participle of cultivō (“till, cultivate”), from cultīvus (“tilled”), from Latin cultus, perfect passive participle of colō (“till, cultivate”), which comes from earlier *quelō, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (“to move; to turn (around)”). Cognates include Ancient Greek πέλω (pelō) and Sanskrit चरति (cárati). The same Proto-Indo-European root also gave Latin in-quil-īnus (“inhabitant”) and anculus (“servant”).

    From Wiktionary