Reward meaning

rĭ-wôrd'
The return for performance of a desired behavior; positive reinforcement.
noun
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The definition of a reward is something paid to a person for the return of something.

An example of reward is the owners of a missing cat giving twenty five dollars to the person who brings the cat home.

noun
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A satisfying return on investment; a profit.
noun
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Money offered or given for some special service, such as the return of a lost article or the capture of a criminal.
noun
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To give a reward to or for.
verb
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Money offered, as for the capture of a criminal, the return of something lost, etc.
noun
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A return for correct response to a stimulus.
noun
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To give a reward to or for.

Why are you rewarding the child for misbehaving?

verb
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To give a reward for.
verb
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Something given in return for good or, sometimes, evil, or for service or merit.
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A consequence that happens to someone as a result of worthy or unworthy behavior.

The rewards of exercise; the rewards of lying to your boss.

noun
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Compensation; profit.
noun
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To give a reward to.
verb
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To serve as a reward to or for.
verb
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The return for performance of a desired behavior; positive reinforcement.
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To give a reward to or for.
verb
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A prize promised for a certain deed or catch.

The rewards for bringing in badly wanted criminals are printed on 'dead or alive' posters.

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The result of an action, whether good or bad.

Is this the reward I get for telling the truth: to be put in jail?

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Bible, 1 Sam. xxiv. 17

Thou hast rewarded me good, whereas I have rewarded thee evil.

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Decorations are meant to reward the most meritous acts and services.

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Something of value given in return for an act.

For catching the thief, you'll get a nice reward.

noun
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Origin of reward

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman from rewarder to take notice of re- intensive pref. (from Latin re–) (warder to guard, watch over) (of Germanic origin wer-3 in Indo-European roots)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English rewarden, from Anglo-Norman rewarder (“to reward") (compare Old French reguarder, whence modern French regarder, also English regard through Middle French), from re- + warder (“to guard, keep"), from Old Northern French, from Frankish *wardōn (“to guard, keep"), from Proto-Germanic *wardōnÄ… (“to guard, defend"), from Proto-Indo-European *ewerwǝ-, *werwǝ-, *wrÅ«- (“to cover, shelter, defend, guard, shut"). Cognate with Old Saxon wardōn (“to guard, provide for, protect"), Old English weardian (“to watch, guard, keep"), Old High German wartÄ“n (“to watch, keep, look after"). More at ward.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English reward, rewarde, from Anglo-Norman reward (“reward") (compare Old French reguard, whence modern French regard, and also English regard through Middle French), from rewarder (“to reward") (compare Old French reguarder), from re- + warder (“to guard, keep") (compare Old French guarder); the Anglo-Norman forms are derived from Old Northern French variants of Old French, ultimately of Germanic (Frankish) origin. Cf. regard, warden, guard. See more below.
    From Wiktionary
  • Displaced native Middle English lean (“reward"), from Old English lÄ“an (“reward"); Middle English meed, mede (“reward, meed, recompense"), from Old English mÄ“d (“reward, meed, recompense"); Middle English schipe, schepe (“reward, wage"), from Old English scipe (“wages, payment, reward").
    From Wiktionary