Correct meaning

kə-rĕkt
To make corrections.
verb
6
2
To adjust so as to meet a required standard or condition.

Correct the wheel alignment on a car.

verb
3
1
To correct is defined as to remove errors or to point out errors.

An example of to correct is a piano teacher showing his student which keys are right in order to make the sound for which the teacher was hoping.

An example of to correct is a third grade teacher marking the words that were not spelled right on a spelling test.

verb
3
2
The definition of correct is something true, right or proper.

An example of correct used as an adjective is the phrase "correct procedure," such as baking a cheese cake in a springform pan is the correct procedure.

adjective
2
2
To make adjustments; compensate.

Correcting for the effects of air resistance.

verb
2
2
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To remedy or counteract (a defect, for example).

The new glasses corrected his blurry vision.

verb
1
3
Free from error or fault; true or accurate.
adjective
0
0
Conforming to standards; proper.

Correct behavior.

adjective
0
0
To make right; change from wrong to right; remove errors from.
verb
0
0
To point out or mark the errors or faults of.
verb
0
0
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To make conform to a standard.
verb
0
0
To scold or punish so as to cause to rectify faults.
verb
0
0
To cure, remove, or counteract (a fault, disease, etc.)
verb
0
0
To make corrections; specif., to make an adjustment so as to compensate (for an error, counteracting force, etc.)
verb
0
0
Conforming or adhering to an established standard; proper.

Correct behavior.

adjective
0
0
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Conforming to fact or logic; true, accurate, right, or free from errors.
adjective
0
0
Equal to the required or established amount, number, price, etc.
adjective
0
0
Free from error; true; the state of having an affirmed truth.
adjective
0
0
With good manners; well behaved; conforming with accepted standards of behaviour.
adjective
0
0
To make something that was not valid become right. To remove error.

He corrected the position of the book on the mantle.

verb
0
0
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(by extension) To grade (examination papers).
verb
0
0
To inform (someone) of the latter's error.

It's rude to correct your parents.

verb
0
0

Origin of correct

  • Middle English correcten from Latin corrigere corrēct- com- intensive pref. com– regere to rule reg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French correct, from Latin correctus (“improved, amended, correct”), past participle of corrigere, conrigere (“to make straight, make right, make better, improve, correct”), from com- (“together”) + regere (“to make straight, rule”).

    From Wiktionary