Subject definition

sŭbjĕkt, -jĭkt
Being in a position or in circumstances that place one under the power or authority of another or others.

Subject to the law.

adjective
11
4
A subject is someone or something that is under the control of another.

An example of subject is a person living in England being under the authority of the queen.

noun
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3
Subject means something or someone that is a topic of a discussion, writing, art piece or area of study.

An example of subject is a class about US History.

An example of subject is a series of paintings featuring trees.

noun
6
3
Conditional upon.

The local board sets local policy, subject to approval from the State Board.

adjective
3
0
To subjugate; subdue.
verb
3
2
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Having a disposition or tendency; liable (to)

Subject to fits of anger.

adjective
3
2
Liable to receive; exposed (to)

Subject to censure.

adjective
2
1
(grammar) The noun, noun phrase, or pronoun in a sentence or clause that denotes the doer of the action or what is described by the predicate.
noun
1
0
The mind or thinking part as distinguished from the object of thought.
noun
1
0
Something dealt with in discussion, study, writing, painting, etc.; theme.
noun
1
0
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Originating cause, reason, or motive.
noun
1
0
Any of the various courses of study in a school or college; branch of learning.
noun
1
0
(logic) That part of a proposition about which something is said; that which is affirmed or denied.
noun
1
0
The mind, or ego, that thinks and feels, as distinguished from everything outside the mind.
noun
1
0
To bring under the authority or control of; cause to owe allegiance.
verb
1
0
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To make liable or vulnerable.

To subject oneself to the contempt of others.

verb
1
0
(rare) To place before; submit.

A plan subjected for approval.

verb
1
0
Placed or situated under; lying below, or in a lower situation.

adjective
1
0
(grammar) In a clause: the word or word group (usually a noun phrase) that is dealt with. In active clauses with verbs denoting an action, the subject and the actor are usually the same.

In the sentence "˜The mouse is eaten by the cat in the kitchen.', "˜The mouse' is the subject, "˜the cat' being the agent.

noun
1
0
A particular area of study.

Her favorite subject is physics.

noun
1
0
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I am a British subject.

noun
1
0
(music) The main theme or melody, especially in a fugue.
noun
1
0
(construed with to) To cause (someone or something) to undergo a particular experience, especially one that is unpleasant or unwanted.
verb
1
0
Contingent or dependent.

A vacation subject to changing weather.

adjective
5
5
Prone; disposed.

A child who is subject to colds.

adjective
4
4
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The definition of subject is someone or something likely to do or be affected by something or someone.

An example of subject is a child who tends to throw fits when they don't get their way.

adjective
1
1
Likely to incur or receive; exposed.

A directive subject to misinterpretation.

adjective
1
1
To cause to experience, undergo, or be acted upon.

Suspects subjected to interrogation; rocks subjected to intense pressure.

verb
1
1
To submit to the authority of.

Peoples that subjected themselves to the emperor.

verb
1
1
A person under the authority or control of another; esp., a person owing allegiance to a particular ruler, government, etc.
noun
1
1
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Someone or something made to undergo a treatment, experiment, analysis, dissection, etc.
noun
1
1
(logic) The term of a proposition about which something is affirmed or denied.
noun
0
0
One concerning which something is said or done; a person or thing being discussed or dealt with.

A subject of gossip.

noun
0
0
Something that is treated or indicated in a work of art.
noun
0
0
(music) A theme of a composition, especially a fugue.
noun
0
0
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One that experiences or is subjected to something.

The subject of ridicule.

noun
0
0
A person or animal that is the object of medical or scientific study.

The experiment involved 12 subjects.

noun
0
0
A corpse intended for anatomical study and dissection.
noun
0
0
One who is under surveillance.

The subject was observed leaving the scene of the murder.

noun
0
0
Subject is defined as to make someone or something experience something.

An example of subject is leaving someone in the room with another person who won't stop talking.

verb
0
1
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A subject is someone or something that is under the authority of another or others.

An example of subject is having to obey rules.

adjective
0
1
The essential nature or substance of something as distinguished from its attributes.
noun
0
1
Under the authority or control of, or owing allegiance to, another.

Subject peoples.

adjective
0
1
Contingent or conditional upon (with to)

Subject to your approval.

adjective
0
1
The main theme or melody of a musical composition or movement, esp., the opening theme in a fugue.
noun
0
1
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(gram.) The noun or other substantive that is one of the two immediate constituents of a sentence and about which something is said in the predicate.
noun
0
1
The actual substance of anything as distinguished from its qualities and attributes.
noun
0
1
(obs.) To place under or below.
verb
0
1
To cause to experience or receive some action or treatment.

To subject someone to interrogation, subject a new drug to rigorous testing.

verb
0
1
Likely to be affected by or to experience something.

A country subject to extreme heat.

Menu listings and prices are subject to change.

He's subject to sneezing fits.

adjective
0
1
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Placed under the power of another; owing allegiance to a particular sovereign or state.
adjective
0
1
The main topic of a paper, work of art, discussion, field of study, etc.
noun
0
1
A person ruled over by another, especially a monarch or state authority.
noun
0
1
A human, animal or an inanimate object that is being examined, treated, analysed, etc.
noun
0
1
A course or area of study.

Math is her best subject.

noun
1
3
One who is under the rule of another or others, especially one who owes allegiance to a government or ruler.
noun
0
2
A basis for action; a cause.
noun
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
subject
Plural:
subjects

Origin of subject

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin subiectus from past participle of sūbicere to subject sub- sub- iacere to throw yē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English subget, from Old French suget, from Latin subiectus (“lying under or near, adjacent, also subject, exposed"), as a noun, subiectus (“a subject, an inferior"), subiectum (“the subject of a proposition"), past participle of subiciō (“throw, lay, place"), from sub (“under, at the foot of") + iaciō (“throw, hurl").

    From Wiktionary