Province definition

prŏvĭns
Frequency:
Any of various lands outside Italy conquered by the Romans and administered by them as self-contained units.
noun
30
17
Areas of a country situated away from the capital or population center.
noun
21
10
(ecology) An area of land, less extensive than a region, having a characteristic plant and animal population.
noun
16
7
(ecclesiastical) A division of territory under the jurisdiction of a metropolitan.
noun
14
6
A division of a country under the jurisdiction of an archbishop or metropolitan.
noun
8
0
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An area of knowledge, activity, or interest.

A topic falling within the province of ancient history.

noun
8
4
Any of the outside territories controlled and ruled by ancient Rome.
noun
4
1
A territory governed as an administrative or political unit of a country or empire.
noun
4
2
A territorial district; territory.
noun
2
0
An administrative division of a country; specif., any of the ten main administrative divisions of Canada.
noun
5
4
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The range of one's proper duties and functions; scope.
noun
3
2
The parts of a country removed from the capital and the populated, cultural centers.
noun
1
1
A territorial area within a country.
noun
0
0
An area, division, or branch of learning or activity.
noun
5
6
Proper duties or functions; sphere.

Enforcing the laws does not fall within the province of this commission.

noun
3
4
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The definition of a province is a specific area or location within a country or state that is often a subset of a larger union.

Ontario is an example of a province of Canada.

noun
0
1
A division of the world, smaller than a region, with reference to the plants or animals found there.
noun
0
1
A subdivision of government usually one step below the national level.
noun
0
1
A jurisdiction; a (literal or figurative) area of authority.
noun
0
1
(UK) Northern Ireland.
pronoun
0
1
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
province
Plural:
provinces

Origin of province

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin prōvincia

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English provynce, from Old French *province, from Latin prōvincia (“territory brought under Roman domination; official duty, office, charge, province"), from Proto-Indo-European *prōw- (“right judge, master"). Cognate with Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌰𐌿𐌾𐌰 (frauja, “lord, master"), Old English frÄ“a (“ruler, lord, king, master"). See also frow.

    From Wiktionary