Orbit meaning

ôrbĭt
To move in an orbit.
verb
6
2
To orbit is to move around something in a circle.

When the earth moves around the sun, this action is an example of to orbit.

verb
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2
The definition of an orbit is a circular shape, the rotation of one full circle or a range of experience.

The path the earth takes around the sun is an example of the earth's orbit.

The 365 days it takes the earth to get around the sun is an example of the time it takes for a complete orbit or full circle around.

The experiences and actions of one person during a period of time is an example of his orbit.

noun
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2
To revolve around (a center of attraction).

The moon orbits Earth.

verb
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3
To move in an orbit around.
verb
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0
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The bony cavity containing the eye; eye socket.
noun
1
1
To move in an orbit or circle.
verb
1
1
To put (a satellite or spacecraft) into an orbit in space.
verb
1
1
Either of two bony cavities in the skull containing an eye and its external structures.
noun
1
2
To put into an orbit.

The space agency orbited a new satellite.

verb
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2
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The path followed by a celestial body or artificial satellite as it revolves around another body due to the force of gravity. Orbits are nearly elliptical or circular in shape and are very closely approximated by Kepler's laws of planetary motion.
noun
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One complete revolution of such a body.
noun
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A stable quantum state of an electron (or other particle) in motion around an atomic nucleus.
noun
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0
Either of two bony hollows in the skull containing the eye and its associated structures.
noun
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To move in an orbit around another body.
verb
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To put into an orbit, as a satellite is put into orbit around the Earth.
verb
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A circular or elliptical path of one object around another object.

The Moon's orbit around the Earth takes nearly one month to complete.

noun
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A sphere of influence; an area of control.

In the post WWII era, several eastern European countries came into the orbit of the Soviet Union.

noun
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The course of one's usual progression, or the extent of one's typical range.

The convenience store was a heavily travelled point in her daily orbit, as she purchased both cigarettes and lottery tickets there.

noun
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(anatomy) The bony cavity containing the eyeball; the eye socket.
noun
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(physics) The path an electron takes around an atom's nucleus.
noun
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(mathematics) A collection of points related by the evolution function of a dynamical system.
noun
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To circle or revolve around another object.

The Earth orbits the Sun.

verb
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To move around the general vicinity of something.

The harried mother had a cloud of children orbiting her, asking for sweets.

verb
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To place an object into an orbit around a planet.

A rocket was used to orbit the satellite.

verb
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The path of a body in a field of force surrounding another body; for example, the movement of an atomic electron in relation to a nucleus.
noun
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1
The skin around the eye of a bird.
noun
0
1

Origin of orbit

  • Middle English orbite eye socket from Old French from Latin orbita orbit probably from orbis

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin orbita (“course, track”).

    From Wiktionary