Retrograde meaning

rĕtrə-grād
The definition of retrograde is something that is a move backwards or a decline in condition or quality.

When a new technology comes out that is actually a step backward and worse than the technology before it, this is an example of something that would be described as retrograde.

adjective
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Retrograde is to move backwards, or to decline to a prior worse condition.

If you had begun to feel better but then your condition worsens to where it was a few weeks ago, this is an example of when it retrogrades.

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Moving or tending backward.

A retrograde flow.

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Opposite to the usual order; inverted or reversed.

The retrograde form of the melody.

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Reverting to an earlier or inferior condition.

A retrograde way of thinking.

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To have retrograde motion.
verb
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To decline to an inferior state; degenerate.
verb
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To move or seem to move backward.
verb
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Moving or directed backward; retiring or retreating.
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Inverse or reverse.
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Going back or tending to go back to an earlier, esp. worse, condition; retrogressive.
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Opposed; contrary.
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Designating motion backward in a melody, specif. so as to begin with the last note and end with the first.
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To go, or seem to go, backward.
verb
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To become worse; decline; deteriorate; degenerate.
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To have a retrograde motion.
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Having a rotational or orbital movement that is opposite to the movement of most bodies within a celestial system. In the solar system, retrograde bodies are those that rotate or orbit in a clockwise direction (east to west) when viewed from a vantage point above the Earth's north pole. Venus, Uranus, and Pluto have retrograde rotational movements. No planets in the solar system have retrograde orbital movements, but four of Jupiter's moons exhibit such movement.
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Having a brief, regularly occurring, apparently backward movement in the sky as viewed from Earth against the background of fixed stars. Retrograde movement of the planets is caused by the differing orbital velocities of Earth and the body observed. For example, the outer planets normally appear to drift gradually eastward in the sky in relation to the fixed stars; that is, they appear night after night to fall a little farther behind the neighboring stars in their westward passage across the sky. However, at certain times a particular planet appears briefly to speed up and move westward a bit more quickly than the neighboring stars. This happens as Earth, in its faster inner orbit, overtakes and passes the planet in its slower outer orbit; the appearance of moving counter to its usual eastward drift is thus simply the result of perspective as seen from Earth.
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Directed backwards, retreating; reverting especially inferior state, declining; inverse, reverse; movement opposite to normal or intended motion, often circular motion.

Retrograde ideas, morals, etc.

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(astronomy, of a body orbiting another) In the opposite direction to the orbited body's spin.
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A degenerate person.
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(music) The reversal of a melody so that what is played first in the original melody is played last and what is played last in the original melody is played first.
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(intransitive) To move backwards; to recede; to retire; to decline; to revert.
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(intransitive, astronomy) To show retrogradation.
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Origin of retrograde

  • Middle English from Latin retrōgradus from retrōgradī to go back retrō- retro- -gradus walking (from gradī to go ghredh- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin retrōgradior or Late Latin retrogredere (retro- (“back") + gradi (“walk")).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English < Latin retrogradus.

    From Wiktionary