Recede meaning

rĭ-sēd
To move back or away from a limit, point, or mark.

Waited for the floodwaters to recede.

verb
9
2
To recede is to diminish or to move back.

An example of recede is when your hairline starts to move backwards along your head as you grow bald.

An example of recede is when your feelings of grief or sadness after a loss gradually begin to go away.

verb
5
1
To decrease or diminish.

Fuel prices will recede after the holiday.

verb
3
1
To slope away from a point of reference.

A man with a chin that recedes.

verb
2
1
To become or seem to become more distant and fainter or less distinct.

Eventually, my unhappy memories of the place receded.

verb
2
1
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To yield or grant to one formerly in possession; cede (something) back.
verb
1
1
To slope backward.
verb
1
1
To become more distant, and hence indistinct.

Early memories recede.

verb
1
1
To become less; diminish.

Receding prices.

verb
1
1
To cede back.
verb
1
1
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To move back; to retreat; to withdraw.
verb
1
1
To cede back; to grant or yield again to a former possessor.

To recede conquered territory.

verb
1
1
To take back.
verb
1
1
To withdraw (from)

To recede from a promise.

verb
0
1

Origin of recede

  • Middle English receden from Old French receder from Latin recēdere re- re- cēdere to go ked- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • re– cede

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French receder, from Latin recedere (“to withdraw; to go back"), from re- with cedere (“to go").

    From Wiktionary