Recess definitions

rē'sĕs', rĭ-sĕs'
A receding or hollow place, as in a surface, wall, etc.; niche.
noun
67
2
A secluded, withdrawn, or inner place.

Subterranean recesses, the recesses of the subconscious.

noun
64
1
A small cavity, hollow, indentation, etc. in an organ or part.
noun
61
0
To take a recess.
verb
58
0
To place or set in a recess.
verb
55
1
To form a recess in.
verb
52
0
A remote, secret, or secluded place.

A bird that lives deep in the recesses of the forest.

noun
52
1
To place in a recess.
verb
49
1
To halt temporarily.

To recess a hearing.

verb
49
1
To create or fashion a recess in.

Recessed a portion of the wall.

verb
46
1
To suspend for a recess.

The committee chair recessed the hearings.

verb
43
1
To take a recess.

The investigators recessed for lunch.

verb
40
0
Recess means a break time.

An example of recess is when Congress is not in session.

An example of recess is when students take a break from school work to play outside.

noun
24
1
The definition of a recess is an indentation in a wall or other surface.

An example of a recess is a light fixture that is slightly embedded into the ceiling.

noun
21
0
To recess is to take a break.

An example of to recess is to stop a trial for lunch.

verb
18
0
A decree of the imperial diet of the old German empire.

noun
11
0
(obsolete, rare) Remote, distant (in time or place).

Thomas Salusbury: Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems: I should think it best in the subsequent discourses to begin to examine whether the Earth be esteemed immoveable, as it hath been till now believed by most men, or else moveable, as some ancient Philosophers held, and others of not very recesse times were of opinion;

adjective
11
0
(countable or uncountable) A break, pause or vacation.

Spring recess offers a good chance to travel.

noun
8
0
(archaic) A withdrawing or retiring; a moving back; retreat.

The recess of the tides.

noun
8
0

Put a generous recess behind the handle for finger space.

noun
5
0
(archaic) The state of being withdrawn; seclusion; privacy.
noun
5
0
(US) A time of play, usually, on a playground.

Students who do not listen in class will not play outside during recess.

noun
2
0
(archaic) A place of retirement, retreat, secrecy, or seclusion.
noun
2
0
A temporary cessation of the customary activities of an engagement, occupation, or pursuit.

The chairman of the committee called for a recess until Thursday.

noun
0
0
A period in the school day during which students are given time to play or relax.
noun
0
0
An indentation or small hollow.

Dirt accumulated in the recesses of the statue.

noun
0
0
An alcove.
noun
0
0
A temporary withdrawal from or halting as of work, business, or study.
noun
0
0
In elementary school, a scheduled period of relaxation or play, esp. outdoors.
noun
0
0
A secret or abstruse part.

The difficulties and recesses of science.

noun
0
0
(botany, zoology) A sinus.
noun
0
0
To inset into something, or to recede.

Wow, look at how that gargoyle recesses into the rest of architecture.

Recess the screw so it does not stick out.

verb
0
0
(intransitive) To take or declare a break.

This court shall recess for its normal two hour lunch now.

Class will recess for 20 minutes.

verb
0
0
(informal) To appoint, with a recess appointment.
verb
0
0
To make a recess in.

To recess a wall.

verb
0
0

Origin of recess

Latin recessus retreat from past participle of recēdere to recede recede1