Corner meaning

kôrnər
Corner means to force into an awkward or tight spot, to get the most of something, or to make turns in a vehicle.

An example of corner is to back an opponent up against the intersection of two walls; to corner the opponent.

An example of corner is to buy all the available units of a certain product at a grocery store; to corner the market on the item.

An example of corner is to turn the steering wheel to the left or right to test the turning capability of a car; to test how the car corners.

verb
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The definition of corner is at an area where two lines or surfaces meet.

An example of corner used as an adjective is in the phrase "corner store," which means a store where two streets meet each other.

adjective
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To get command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to put one's own price on it.

The buyers attempted to corner the shares of the railroad stock, so as to facilitate their buyout.

It's extremely hard to corner the petroleum market because there are so many players.

verb
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A corner is defined as a place where lines or sides join together to form an angle, or a remote or secluded place.

An example of a corner is where two walls in a room come together.

An example of a corner is searching an uncharted area of the earth; searching every corner of the city.

noun
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The place where two roads or streets join or intersect.
noun
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A threatening or embarrassing position from which escape is difficult.

Got myself into a corner by boasting.

noun
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A remote, secluded, or secret place.

The four corners of the earth; a beautiful little corner of Paris.

noun
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A part or piece made to fit on a corner, as in mounting or for protection.
noun
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To place or drive into a corner.

Cornered the thieves and captured them.

verb
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To form a corner in (a stock or commodity).

Cornered the silver market.

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To furnish with corners.
verb
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To turn, as at a corner.

A truck that corners poorly.

verb
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To come together or be situated on or at a corner.
verb
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Located at a street corner.

A corner drugstore.

adjective
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Designed for use in a corner.

A corner table.

adjective
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The point or place where lines or surfaces join and form an angle.
noun
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The area or space within the angle formed at the joining of lines or surfaces.

The corner of a room.

noun
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The area at the tip of any of the angles formed at a street intersection.
noun
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Something used to form, mark, protect, or decorate a corner.
noun
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A remote, secret, or secluded place.

Look in every nook and corner.

noun
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Region; quarter; part.

Every corner of America.

noun
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An awkward position from which escape is difficult.

Driven into a corner.

noun
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A monopoly acquired on a stock or a commodity so as to be able to control the price.
noun
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(boxing) Any of the four areas in the ring where the ropes meet to form 90° angles, esp., either of two such areas at opposite ends of the ring, used by the boxers between rounds for rest and medical attention.
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To drive or force into a corner or awkward position, so that escape is difficult.
verb
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To get a monopoly on (a stock or commodity)
verb
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To meet at or abut (on) a corner.
verb
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To turn corners.

A car that corners easily.

verb
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At or on a corner.

A corner store.

adjective
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Used in a corner.

A corner table.

adjective
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The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.
  • The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point.
    The chimney corner was full of cobwebs.
  • The projection into space of an angle in a solid object.
    Herbert bruised his shin on the corner of the coffee table.
  • An intersection of two streets; any of the four outer points off the street at that intersection.
    The liquor store on the corner also sold lottery tickets.

The corners of the wire mesh were reinforced with little blobs of solder.

noun
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An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part, or the direction in which it lies.

Shining a light in the dark corners of the mind.

I took a trip out to his corner of town.

noun
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A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.

On weekends, Emily liked to find a quiet corner and curl up with a good book.

noun
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(business, finance) A monopoly or controlling interest in a salable commodity, allowing the controlling party to dictate terms of sale.

In the 1970s, private investors tried to get a corner on the silver market, but were ultimately unsuccessful.

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(baseball) One of the four vertices of the strike zone.

The pitch was just off the corner, low and outside.

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(baseball) First base or third base.

There are runners on the corners with just one out.

noun
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(soccer) A corner kick.
noun
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To drive (someone) into a corner or other confined space.

The cat had cornered a cricket between the sofa and the television stand.

verb
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To trap in a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment.

The reporter cornered the politician by pointing out the hypocrisy of his position on mandatory sentencing, in light of the politician's own actions in court.

verb
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(automotive) To turn a corner or drive around a curve.

As the stock car driver cornered the last turn, he lost control and spun out.

verb
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(automotive, intransitive) To handle while moving around a corner in a road or otherwise turning.

That BMW corners well, but the suspension is too stiff.

verb
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around the corner
  • About to happen; imminent.
idiom
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around the corner
  • in the immediate vicinity or future
idiom
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cut corners
  • to take a direct route by going across corners
  • to cut down expenses, time, labor, etc.
idiom
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in someone's corner
  • allied with or supporting someone
idiom
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out of the corner of one's eye
  • by means of one's peripheral vision
idiom
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the (four) corners of the earth
  • the farthest parts of the earth
idiom
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turn the corner
  • to get safely past the critical point
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of corner

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman from Old French corne corner, horn from Vulgar Latin corna from Latin cornua pl. of cornū horn, point ker-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English corner, from Anglo-Norman cornere (compare Old French cornier, corniere (“corner”)), from Old French corne (“corner, angle”, literally “a horn, projecting point”), from Vulgar Latin *corna (“horn”), from Latin cornua, plural of cornū (“projecting point, end, horn”). More at hirn.

    From Wiktionary