Veer meaning

vîr
To change the course of (a ship) by turning the stern windward.
verb
3
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To veer is to turn or swerve sharply or to go off course.

When you are going straight and you suddenly turn left, this is an example of a situation where you veer left.

verb
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To change the course of a ship by turning the stern to the wind while advancing to windward; wear ship.
verb
2
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To alter the direction of; turn.

Veered the car sharply to the left.

verb
2
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To shift clockwise in direction, as from north to northeast. Used of the wind.
verb
1
0
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A change in direction; a swerve.
noun
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To let out or release (a line or an anchor train).
verb
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To change direction; shift; turn or swing around.
verb
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To change sides; shift, as from one opinion or attitude to another.
verb
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To shift clockwise (in the Northern Hemisphere)
verb
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To turn or swing; change the course of.
verb
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A change of direction.
noun
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To let out (a rope, anchor chain, etc.) gradually.
verb
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(obsolete, nautical) To let out (a sail-line), to allow (a sheet) to run out.
verb
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A turn or swerve; an instance of veering.
noun
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(intransitive) To change direction or course suddenly; to swerve.

The car slid on the ice and veered out of control.

verb
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(intransitive, of the wind) To change direction in a clockwise direction if in the Northern Hemisphere, or in a counterclockwise direction if in the Southern Hemisphere.
verb
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(intransitive, nautical, of the wind) To shift aft.
verb
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(intransitive, nautical) To change direction into the wind; to wear ship.
verb
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0
verb
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Origin of veer

  • Middle English veren from Middle Dutch vieren per1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • French virer from Old French
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle Dutch vieren (“to slacken").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle French virer.
    From Wiktionary