Fetch meaning

fĕch
To fetch is defined as to go get and bring back.

An example of to fetch is a dog going after a ball to bring it back to the person who threw it.

verb
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To come or go after and take or bring back.

The puppy fetched the stick that I had tossed.

verb
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(nautical) To arrive at; reach.

Fetched port after a month at sea.

verb
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(informal) To deliver (a blow) by striking; deal.
verb
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The act or an instance of fetching.
noun
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A ghost; an apparition.
noun
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A stratagem or trick.
noun
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A doppelgänger.
noun
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To go after and come back with; bring; get.
verb
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To cause to come; produce; elicit.
verb
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To draw (a breath) or heave (a sigh, groan, etc.)
verb
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(rare) To derive or infer.
verb
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To arrive at; reach, esp. when sailing against the wind or tide.
verb
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To bring as a price; sell for.
verb
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(informal) To attract; charm; captivate.
verb
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(informal) To deliver or deal (a blow, stroke, etc.)
verb
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To go after things and bring them back; specif., to retrieve game.
verb
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The act of fetching.
noun
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A trick; dodge.
noun
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The distance a wind blows unobstructed over water, esp. as a factor affecting the buildup of waves.
noun
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The apparition of a living person; wraith.
noun
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To locate the next instruction in memory (RAM) for execution by the CPU. See instruction cycle.
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To retrieve; to bear towards; to go and get.
verb
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To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.

If you put some new tyres on it, and clean it up a bit, the car should fetch about $5,000

verb
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(nautical) To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.
verb
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(intransitive) To bring oneself; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.
verb
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(rare, literary) To take (a breath), to heave (a sigh)
verb
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To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.
verb
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To reduce; to throw.
verb
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To bring to accomplishment; to achieve; to make; to perform, with certain objects.

To fetch a compass; to fetch a leap.

verb
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The object of fetching; the source and origin of attraction; a force, quality or propensity which is attracting eg., in a given attribute of person, place, object, principle, etc.
noun
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A stratagem by which a thing is indirectly brought to pass, or by which one thing seems intended and another is done; a trick; an artifice.
noun
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The apparition of a living person; a wraith; one's double (seeing it is supposed to be a sign that one is fey or fated to die)
noun
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(computing) The act of fetching data.

A fetch from a cache.

noun
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adjective
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To take an indirect route.
verb
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fetch and carry
  • to do minor tasks or chores
idiom
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fetch up
  • to come to a stop; arrive at a destination or stopping place; end up
  • to bring up or raise (a child, pet, etc.)
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of fetch

  • Middle English fecchen from Old English feccean ped- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fecchen, from Old English feċċan, fæċċan (“to fetch”). In one view, an alteration of fetian, fatian ("to fetch, marry"; whence also English fet), from Proto-Germanic *fatōną, *fatjaną (“to fetch”), from Proto-Indo-European *ped- (“foot”).

    From Wiktionary