Collect meaning

kə-lĕkt'
To call for (someone); pick up.

Collected the children and drove home.

verb
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To collect is defined as to gather together or to call for and receive payment.

An example of to collect is having hundreds of rooster statues.

An example of to collect is picking up trash on the beach.

An example of to collect is an agency calling to get money from a debtor to pay an outstanding debt.

verb
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To take in payments or donations.

Collecting for charity.

verb
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To be the site for (an accumulating mass), especially as a consequence of disuse or neglect.

My guitar is collecting dust in the corner.

verb
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To recover control of.

Collect one's emotions.

verb
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To gather together; assemble.
verb
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To come together in a group or mass; gather.

Sand collected in the crevices.

verb
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With payment to be made by the receiver.

Called collect; a collect phone call.

adjective
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To gather (stamps, books, etc.) as a hobby.
verb
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To call for and receive (money) for (rent, a fund, taxes, bills, etc.)
verb
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To pick up; fetch.
verb
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To gather; assemble.

A crowd collected.

verb
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To accumulate.

Water collects in the basement.

verb
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To collect payments, contributions, etc.
verb
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With payment to be made by the receiver.

To telephone collect.

adjective
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To gather together; amass.

Suzanne collected all the papers she had laid out.

verb
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To get; particularly, get from someone.

A bank collects a monthly payment on a client's new car loan. A mortgage company collects a monthly payment on a house.

verb
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To call for and obtain payment of.

Collect taxes.

verb
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A brief formal prayer that is used in various Western liturgies before the epistle and that varies with the day.
noun
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To regain control of (oneself or one's wits); summon up (one's faculties or powers)
verb
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A short prayer suitable to the time or occasion, used in certain church services, as before the Epistle at Mass.
noun
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To accumulate a number of similar or related (objects), particularly for a hobby or recreation.

John Henry collects stamps.

verb
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(now rare) To form a conclusion; to deduce, infer. (Compare gather, get.)
verb
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(intransitive, often with on or against) To collect payments.

He had a lot of trouble collecting on that bet he made.

verb
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(intransitive) To come together in a group or mass.

The rain collected in puddles.

verb
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(intransitive) To collect objects as a hobby.

I don't think he collects as much as hoards.

verb
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To infer; to conclude.
verb
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To be paid for by the recipient, as a telephone call or a shipment.

It was to be a collect delivery, but no-one was available to pay.

adjective
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With payment due from the recipient.

I had to call collect.

adverb
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(Christianity) The prayer said before the reading of the epistle lesson, especially one found in a prayerbook, as with the Book of Common Prayer.

He used the day's collect as the basis of his sermon.

noun
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Origin of collect

  • Middle English collecte from Old French from Medieval Latin collēcta short for (ōrātiō ad) collēctam (prayer at the) gathering from Latin collēctus gathered past participle of colligere to gather collect1
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English collecten from Latin colligere collēct- com- com- legere to gather leg- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English collecten, from Old French collecter, from Medieval Latin collectare (“to collect money”), from Latin collecta (“a collection of money, in Late Latin a meeting, assemblage, in Medieval Latin a tax, also an assembly for prayer, a prayer”), feminine of collectus, past participle of colligere, conligere (“to gather together, collect, consider, conclude, infer”), from com- (“together”) + legere (“to gather”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From Latin "oratio ad collectam" (prayer towards the congregation).
    From Wiktionary