Settle meaning

sĕt'l
To restore calmness or comfort to.

The hot tea settled his nerves.

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To come to an agreement, especially to resolve a lawsuit out of court.
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A long wooden bench with a high back, often including storage space beneath the seat.
noun
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To establish as a resident or residents.

He settled his family in London.

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To become localized in a given part of the body.
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To prevent from creating a disturbance or interfering, or from continuing in such action, as by a reprimand or a blow.
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To make stable or permanent; establish.
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To fix definitely; determine or decide (something in doubt)
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To end (a dispute)
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To pay a bill or debt.
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To move downward; sink or descend, especially gradually.

Darkness settled over the fields. Dust settled in the road.

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To reach a decision; decide.

We finally settled on a solution to the problem.

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A long wooden bench with a back, armrests, and sometimes a chest beneath the seat.
noun
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To put in order; arrange or adjust as desired.

To settle one's affairs.

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To set in place firmly or comfortably.

To settle oneself in a chair.

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To migrate to and set up a community in; colonize.

New York was settled by the Dutch.

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To cause to sink and become more dense and compact.

The rain settled the dust.

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To clarify (a liquid) by causing the sediment to sink to the bottom.
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To free (the mind, nerves, stomach, etc.) from disturbance; calm or quiet.
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To establish in business, office, work, marriage, etc.
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To pay (a bill, debt, account, etc.)
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To make over (property, etc.) to someone by legal action.
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To resolve (a legal dispute) by agreement between the parties.
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To impregnate (a female)
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To stop moving and stay in one place; come to rest.
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To cast itself, as darkness, fog, etc. over a landscape, or gloom or silence over a person or group; descend.
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To take up permanent residence; make one's home.
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To move downward; sink, esp. gradually.

The car settled in the mud.

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To become more dense or compact by sinking, as sediment or loose soil does when shaken.
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To become clearer by the settling of sediment or dregs.
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To become more stable or composed; stop fluctuating or changing.
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(archaic) A seat of any kind.
noun
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A long bench, often with a high back and arms, with storage space underneath for linen.
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To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; especially, to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home, or the like.
verb
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To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to render quiet; to still; to calm; to compose.
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To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; -- said of a liquid.

To settle coffee, or the grounds of coffee.

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To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; -- said of the ground, of roads, and the like.

Clear weather settles the roads.

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To cause to sink; to lower; to depress; hence, also, to render close or compact.

To settle the contents of a barrel or bag by shaking it.

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To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from uncertainty or wavering; to make sure, firm, or constant; to establish; to compose; to quiet.

To settle the mind when agitated; to settle questions of law; to settle the succession to a throne; to settle an allowance.

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To adjust, as something in discussion; to make up; to compose; to pacify.

To settle a quarrel.

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(archaic) To adjust, as accounts; to liquidate; to balance.

To settle an account.

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(colloquial) To pay.
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To plant with inhabitants; to colonize; to people.

The French first settled Canada; the Puritans settled New England; Plymouth was settled in 1620.

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(intransitive) To become fixed or permanent; to become stationary; to establish one's self or itself; to assume a lasting form, condition, direction, or the like, in place of a temporary or changing state.
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(intransitive) To fix one's residence; to establish a dwelling place or home.

The Saxons who settled in Britain.

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(intransitive) To enter into the married state, or the state of a householder.
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(intransitive) To be established in an employment or profession.

To settle in the practice of law.

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(intransitive) To become clear after being turbid or obscure; to clarify by depositing matter held in suspension.

The weather settled; wine settles by standing.

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(intransitive) To sink to the bottom; to fall to the bottom, as dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reservoir.
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(intransitive) To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, as the foundation of a house, etc.
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(intransitive) To become calm; to cease from agitation.
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(intransitive) To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement.

He has settled with his creditors.

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To settle is defined as to put in order, set in place, pay a debt or to resolve a legal dispute.

An example of settle is someone organizing their legal documents.

An example of settle is dust falling to the ground after a sand storm.

An example of settle is paying off a car loan.

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To end or resolve (a dispute, for example) by making a decision or coming to an agreement.
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To discontinue moving and come to rest in one place.

The ball settled in the grass near the green.

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(intransitive) To become firm, dry, and hard, as the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared.

The roads settled late in the spring.

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settle (one's) stomach
  • To relieve one's indigestion or nausea.
idiom
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settle (someone's) hash
  • To silence or subdue.
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settle down
  • To take up permanent residence, a regular job, etc.; lead a more routine, stable life, as after marriage.
  • To become less nervous, restless, or erratic.
  • To become calm as by diminishing in force.
  • To apply oneself steadily or attentively.
idiom
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settle up
  • To determine what is owed and make the necessary adjustments.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of settle

  • Middle English setlen to seat from Old English setlan from setl seat sed- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old English setl, from Germanic *setla-, representing Proto-Indo-European *sed-lo-, from *sed- (“sit"). Cognate with German Sessel, Dutch zetel; and with Greek ἑλλά, Latin sedo, Russian седло, Polish siodÅ‚o. The verb (Old English setlan) developed from the noun.
    From Wiktionary