Compromise definition

kŏmprə-mīz
Something that combines qualities or elements of different things.

The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.

noun
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20
To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
verb
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To weaken or give up (one's principles, ideals, etc.) as for reasons of expediency.
verb
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4
To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
verb
14
1
To lay open to danger, suspicion, or disrepute.
verb
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5
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A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards.

A compromise of morality.

noun
20
9
To impair, as by disease or injury.

An immune system that was compromised by a virus.

verb
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A settlement in which each side gives up some demands or makes concessions.
noun
9
2
A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
noun
8
2
The definition of a compromise is when two sides give up some demands to meet somewhere in the middle.

An example of compromise is a teenager wanting to come home at midnight, while their parent wants them to come home at 10pm, they end up agreeing upon 11pm.

noun
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1
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To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower.

Don't compromise your standards.

verb
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0
To settle or adjust by concessions on both sides.
verb
12
7
(med.) To weaken or otherwise impair.

Drugs that compromised his immune system.

verb
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7
Impairment, as by disease or injury.

Physiological compromise.

noun
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5
The result of such a settlement.
noun
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1
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To settle by mutual concessions.

A dispute that was compromised.

verb
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Exposure, as of one's reputation, to danger, suspicion, or disrepute.
noun
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0
An agreement between two or more parties to settle differences between them by mutual concessions. The result of such concessions. To end a dispute by compromise. To adjust by concessions. Something midway between two or more conflicting, different, or opposing things. A partial payment made by a debtor in exchange for the creditor’s promise not to seek payment of the remainder owed or claimed.
noun
3
0
To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
verb
10
8
To impair, as by disease or injury.

An immune system that was compromised by a virus.

verb
4
2
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Compromise means to give up some demands and agree on something less than what was originally wanted.

An example of compromise is a very clean person deciding they don't need to mop everyday in order to have some quality family time.

verb
2
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To make a compromise or compromises.
verb
4
3
To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute.

A secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.

verb
1
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The result of such an adjustment.
noun
1
0
A weakening, as of one's principles.
noun
1
0
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To breach (a security system).

He tried to compromise the security in the computer by guessing the password.

verb
1
0
Impairment, as by disease or injury.

Physiological compromise.

noun
1
1
A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
noun
1
1
Something midway between two other things in quality, effect, etc.
noun
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0
An adjustment of opposing principles, systems, etc. by modifying some aspects of each.
noun
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0
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The negotiated settlement to a dispute in which at least some of the parties agree to accept less than they originally wanted.Typically, none of the parties that make concessions in the spirit of compromise is ecstatic about the settlement, but all can accept it.The standards-making process is characterized by compromise, with multiple manufacturers, governments, and other interested parties lobbying to enhance their individual positions and ultimately compromising on a specification that often is not the optimum technical solution, but is acceptable to a majority.
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noun
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A committal to something derogatory or objectionable; a prejudicial concession; a surrender.

A compromise of character or right.

noun
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(intransitive) To bind by mutual agreement.
verb
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To adjust and settle by mutual concessions; to compound.
verb
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(intransitive) To find a way between extremes.
verb
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To pledge by some act or declaration; to endanger the life, reputation, etc., of, by some act which can not be recalled; to expose to suspicion.
verb
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verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
compromise
Plural:
compromises

Origin of compromise

  • Middle English compromis from Old French from Latin comprōmissum mutual promise from neuter past participle of comprōmittere to promise mutually com- com- prōmittere to promise promise

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French compromis, from Medieval Latin, Late Latin compromissum (“a compromise, originally a mutual promise to refer to arbitration”), prop. neuter of Latin compromissus, past participle of compromittere (“to make a mutual promise to abide by the decision of an arbiter”), from com- (“together”) + promittere (“to promise”); see promise.

    From Wiktionary