Promise meaning

prŏm'ĭs
The definition of a promise is a statement given by someone that he will do as he said, or it can refer to a person's potential.

An example of a promise is when someone has sworn to meet you at one.

An example of promise is a child prodigy who will probably do great things.

noun
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To promise is to give your word about something or guarantee that you will do whatever you are saying you will do.

An example of promise is when you say to your friend "I swear I will be there."

verb
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Indication of something favorable to come; expectation.

A promise of spring in the air.

noun
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Indication of future excellence or success.

A player of great promise.

noun
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To commit oneself by a promise to do or give; pledge.

Left but promised to return.

verb
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To afford a basis for expecting.

Thunderclouds that promise rain.

verb
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To make a declaration assuring that something will or will not be done.
verb
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To afford a basis for expectation.

An enterprise that promises well.

verb
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An oral or written agreement to do or not to do something.
noun
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Indication, as of a successful prospect or future; basis for expectation.
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Something promised.
noun
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To make a promise.
verb
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To give a basis for expectation.
verb
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To make a promise of (something) to somebody.
verb
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To engage or pledge.

To promise to go.

verb
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To give a basis for expecting.
verb
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To declare emphatically; assure.
verb
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To pledge to give in marriage.
verb
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An avowal to do something or to refrain from doing something, conveyed in such a way as to assure another that it will be done, and that can be considered binding.
noun
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A promise made without expectation of compensation; one not supported by consideration.
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An agreement cloaked in terms that make it appear to be a promise, but not actually committing anything to anybody; for example, “I’ll back you up as long as it’s in my interest to do so.” The person who made that promise is not obligated to do anything.
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An oath or affirmation; a vow.

If I make a promise, I always stick to it; he broke his promise.

noun
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A transaction between two persons whereby the first person undertakes in the future to render some service or gift to the second person or devotes something valuable now and here to his use.
noun
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Reason to expect improvement or success; potential.

She shows great promise as an actress.

noun
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(computing, programming) A placeholder object that can be manipulated in code before it has been assigned a value.
noun
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To commit to something or action; to make an oath; make a vow.

If you promise not to tell anyone, I will let you have this cake for free.

She promised me it was her first time.

He promised to never return to this town again.

She promised me a big kiss if I pick her up for the airport.

I can't promise success, but I'll do the best I can.

verb
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(intransitive) To give grounds for expectation, especially of something good.

The clouds promise rain.

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Origin of promise

  • Middle English promis from Old French promise from Medieval Latin prōmissa alteration of Latin prōmissum from neuter past participle of prōmittere to send forth, promise prō- forth pro–1 mittere to send
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English promis (“promis, promisse"), from Old French promesse, from Medieval Latin promissa, Latin promissum (“a promise"), feminine and neuter of Latin promissus, past participle of promittere (“to send or put forth, let go forward, say beforehand, promise"), from pro (“forth") + mittere (“to send"); see mission. Compare admit, commit, permit, etc. Displaced native Middle English beheste, bihest (“promise, behest") (from Old English behÇ£s (“promise, vow")), Middle English hight (“promise") (from Old English hÄ“ht, past tense of Old English hātan (“to promise")), Middle English hat, haut (“promise, vow") (from Old English Ä¡ehāt (“promise, vow")), Middle English quidde, quid (“saying, promise"). Compare Middle English forhaten, forhauten (“to promise").
    From Wiktionary