Oath meaning

ōth
Frequency:
A sworn promise to carry out the duties and responsibilities of a position, diligently and as required by law.
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A solemn pledge or promise to a god, king, or another person, to attest to the truth of a statement or contract.
noun
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The definition of an oath is a sworn or solemn promise.

When you put your hand on a bible and swear to tell the truth in court, this is an example of a time when you take an oath.

noun
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(archaic) To pledge.
verb
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A solemn swearing to the truth of statements delivered orally and/or in written form. Making of false statements while under oath may result in prosecution for perjury. An affidavit is a written oath. See also affirmation.
noun
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(law) An affirmation of the truth of a statement.
noun
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An irreverent or blasphemous use of the name of God or something held sacred.
noun
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The irreverent or profane use of the name of God or of a sacred thing to express anger or emphasize a statement.
noun
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(1) (Oath) The previous name of Verizon's media offerings. See Verizon Media Group.
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A light or insulting use of a solemn pledge or promise to a god, king or another person, to attest to the truth of a statement or contract the name of a deity in a profanity, as in swearing oaths.
noun
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Shouting out (as in 'oathing obsenities')
verb
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An imprecation; a curse.
noun
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A swearword; curse.
noun
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The affirmed statement or promise accepted as equivalent to an oath.
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take an oath
  • To agree to a pledge of truthfulness or faithful performance.
idiom
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under oath
  • Under a burden or responsibility to speak truthfully or perform an action faithfully.
idiom
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take oath
  • to promise or declare by making an oath; swear solemnly
idiom
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under oath
  • bound or obligated by having made a formal oath, as in a court of law
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

take an oath
under oath
take oath
under oath

Origin of oath

  • Middle English oth from Old English āth

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ooth, oth, ath, from Old English āþ (“oath"), from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz (“oath"), from Proto-Indo-European *oyt- (“oath"). Cognate with Scots aith, athe (“oath"), North Frisian ith, iss (“oath"), West Frisian eed (“oath"), Dutch eed (“oath"), German Eid (“oath"), Swedish ed (“oath"), Icelandic eið (“oath"), Latin Å«tor (“use, employ, avail"), Old Irish óeth (“oath").

    From Wiktionary