Ed Definition

ĕd
noun
Education.
Drivers ed, sex-ed classes.
Webster's New World

(titular) Abbreviation of Editor.

Wiktionary
Synonyms:
male erecticle dysfunctionerectile-dysfunction
abbreviation
Effective dose.
American Heritage Medicine
Edited (by)
Webster's New World
Election district.
American Heritage
Edition.
Webster's New World
Editor.
Webster's New World
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suffix
Used to form the past tense of regular verbs.
Tasted.
American Heritage
Used to form the past participle of regular verbs.
Absorbed.
American Heritage
Having; characterized by; resembling.
Redheaded; strong-minded.
American Heritage
affix
Forming the past tense of weak verbs.
Walked, wanted.
Webster's New World
Forming the past participle of weak verbs.
Webster's New World
Forming analogous adjectives from nouns and verbs and from adjectives ending in -ate.
Cultured people, measured cadences; echinated.
Webster's New World
That is provided with or characterized by.
Bearded, diseased.
Webster's New World
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pronoun

A diminutive of Edward, Edgar, Edwin, or other male given names beginning with Ed-.

Wiktionary

Abbreviation of Edinburgh.

Wiktionary
prefix
(obsolete, no longer productive) A prefix of Old English origin meaning "again", "back", "anew", equivalent to re-.
Eddish, eddy, edgrow, edgrowth, ednew, edquicken.
Wiktionary

Other Word Forms of Ed

Noun

Singular:
ed
Plural:
EdD, eds

Origin of Ed

  • From Middle English ed-, from Old English ed- (“again, re-”), from Proto-Germanic *idi-, *idi, *ida (“back, backwards, again”), from Proto-Indo-European *et, *at (“and, but”). Cognate with German dialectal it- (“again, back”), Icelandic ið- (“again, back”), Gothic [script?] (id-, “again, back”), Welsh ad-, ed- (“again, back”), Latin et (“and”), Latin at (“but, moreover”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English -ede from Old English -ade, -ede, -ode

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English -ede, -de from Old English -ed, -od

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English -ad, -ed, -od

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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