Ed meaning

ĕd
Erectile dysfunction.
abbreviation
12
11
(obsolete, no longer productive) A prefix of Old English origin meaning "again", "back", "anew", equivalent to re-.

Eddish, eddy, edgrow, edgrowth, ednew, edquicken.

prefix
7
1
Erectile dysfunction.
abbreviation
4
1
Edition.
abbreviation
3
2
Abbreviation of Edinburgh.
pronoun
3
2
Advertisement
Effective dose.
abbreviation
3
3
A diminutive of Edward, Edgar, Edwin, or other male given names beginning with Ed-.
pronoun
2
1
(titular) Abbreviation of Editor.
noun
2
2
Used to form the past participle of regular verbs.

Absorbed.

suffix
2
3
Education.

Drivers ed, sex-ed classes.

noun
2
3
Advertisement
Edited (by)
abbreviation
1
0
Education.
abbreviation
1
0
Department of Education.
abbreviation
1
0
Forming the past tense of weak verbs.

Walked, wanted.

affix
1
0
That is provided with or characterized by.

Bearded, diseased.

affix
1
0
Advertisement
Effective dose.
abbreviation
1
0
(1) (Enhanced Definition) See EDTV.
1
0
Editor.
abbreviation
1
1
Used to form the past tense of regular verbs.

Tasted.

suffix
1
1
Having; characterized by; resembling.

Redheaded; strong-minded.

suffix
1
1
Advertisement
Erectile dysfunction.
abbreviation
1
1
Ed is defined as education.

An example of ed is driver’s ed.

abbreviation
1
4
Election district.
abbreviation
1
4
ED is defined as an abbreviation for erectile dysfunction.

An example of ED is a medical issue a patient may have for which they are prescribed the drug Viagra.

abbreviation
1
6
Education.

Driver's ed; adult ed.

noun
0
3
Advertisement

Origin of ed

  • Middle English -ede from Old English -ade, -ede, -ode

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English -ede, -de from Old English -ed, -od

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English -ad, -ed, -od

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ed-, from Old English ed- (“again, re-”), from Proto-Germanic *idi-, *idi, *ida (“back, backwards, again”), from Proto-Indo-European *et, *at (“and, but”). Cognate with German dialectal it- (“again, back”), Icelandic ið- (“again, back”), Gothic [script?] (id-, “again, back”), Welsh ad-, ed- (“again, back”), Latin et (“and”), Latin at (“but, moreover”).

    From Wiktionary