Lie meaning

A false statement deliberately presented as being true; a falsehood.
noun
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4
To occupy a position or place.

The lake lies beyond this hill.

verb
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(law) To be admissible or maintainable.
verb
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4
To be buried in a specified place.
verb
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5
To extend.

Our land lies between these trees and the river.

verb
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4
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Lie means to recline on a horizontal surface.

An example of lie is a person being flat on their back.

verb
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(archaic) To stay for a night or short while.
verb
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The manner or position in which something is situated.
noun
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A haunt or hiding place of an animal.
noun
1
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To bring, put, accomplish, etc. by lying.

To lie his way into political office.

verb
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(law) To be sustainable; to be capable of being maintained.
verb
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Lie is defined as to say something that knowingly isn't true.

An example of lie is a forty year old person saying they are twenty five.

verb
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The definition of a lie is a false statement.

An example of lie is saying the sky is green.

noun
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Something meant to deceive or mistakenly accepted as true.

Learned his parents had been swindlers and felt his whole childhood had been a lie.

noun
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To present false information with the intention of deceiving.
verb
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To convey a false image or impression.

Appearances often lie.

verb
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To say or write as a lie.
verb
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To be or put oneself in a reclining position along a relatively horizontal surface.
verb
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To be in a more or less horizontal position on some supporting surface.
verb
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To be or remain in a specified condition.

Motives that lie hidden.

verb
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To be situated.

Canada lies to the north.

verb
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To extend; stretch.

The road that lies before us.

verb
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To be buried or entombed.
verb
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(archaic) To stay overnight or for a short while; lodge.
verb
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(archaic) To have sexual intercourse (with)
verb
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(law) To be maintainable or admissible.

An action that will not lie.

verb
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(golf) To have, on the hole being played, a score of.

After her approach shot, she lies three on the ninth hole.

verb
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The way in which something is situated or arranged; lay.
noun
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An animal's lair or resting place.
noun
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(brit.) A period of resting.
noun
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(golf) The relative situation of a ball with reference to the advantage it offers the player.

A good lie.

noun
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To give a false impression; be deceptive.

Statistics can lie.

verb
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A false statement or action, esp. one made with intent to deceive.
noun
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Anything that gives or is meant to give a false impression.
noun
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(person) 1896-1968; Norw. statesman: 1st secretary-general of the United Nations (1946-53)
proper name
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Available, to exist. Example: No cause of action will lie for trespass if the landowner gave his permission to enter onto the land.
verb
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(intransitive) To rest in a horizontal position on a surface.

The book lies on the table; the snow lies on the roof; he lies in his coffin.

verb
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(intransitive) To be placed or situated.
verb
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To abide; to remain for a longer or shorter time; to be in a certain state or condition.

To lie waste; to lie fallow; to lie open; to lie hid; to lie grieving; to lie under one's displeasure; to lie at the mercy of the waves.

The paper does not lie smooth on the wall.

verb
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To be or exist; to belong or pertain; to have an abiding place; to consist; used with in.
verb
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(archaic) To lodge; to sleep.
verb
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To be still or quiet, like one lying down to rest.
verb
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(golf) The terrain and conditions surrounding the ball before it is struck.
noun
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(medicine) The position of a fetus in the womb.
noun
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(intransitive) To give false information intentionally.

When Pinocchio lies, his nose grows.

If you are found to have lied in court, you could face a penalty.

While a principle-based approach might claim that lying is always morally wrong, the casuist would argue that, depending upon the details of the case, lying might or might not be illegal or unethical. The casuist might conclude that a person is wrong to lie in legal testimony under oath, but might argue that lying actually is the best moral choice if the lie saves a life.WP.

verb
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(intransitive) To convey a false image or impression.

Photos often lie.

Hips don't lie.

verb
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I knew he was telling a lie by his facial expression.

noun
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A statement intended to deceive, even if literally true; a half-truth.
noun
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Anything that misleads or disappoints.
noun
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0
The Long Island Expressway, I-495.
initialism
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To be or place oneself at rest in a flat, horizontal, or recumbent position; recline.

He lay under a tree to sleep.

verb
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1
To be or remain in a specified condition.

The dust has lain undisturbed for years. He lay sick in bed.

verb
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1
(sports) The position of a golf ball that has come to a stop.
noun
0
1
To be; exist; be found.

The love that lies in her eyes.

verb
0
1
To be placed on or supported by a surface that is usually horizontal.

Dirty dishes lay on the table.

verb
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2
lie
  • To keep oneself or one's plans hidden.
  • To bide one's time but remain ready for action.
idiom
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lie through (one's) teeth
  • To lie outrageously or brazenly.
idiom
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lie down on the job
  • to put forth considerably less than one's best efforts
idiom
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lie in
  • to be in confinement for childbirth
idiom
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lie low
idiom
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lie off
  • to stay at a distance from shore or another ship
idiom
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0
lie over
  • to stay and wait until some future time
idiom
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lie to
  • to lie more or less stationary with the bow to the wind
idiom
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0
take lying down
  • to submit to (punishment, a wrong, etc.) without protest
idiom
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0
give the lie to
  • to charge with telling a lie
  • to prove to be false; belie
idiom
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0
lie in one's throat
  • to tell a foul or outrageous lie
idiom
0
0

Origin of lie

  • Middle English lien from Old English licgan legh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English lyge leugh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lien (“to lie, tell a falsehood"), from Old English lÄ“ogan (“to lie"), from Proto-Germanic *leuganÄ… (“to lie"), from Proto-Indo-European *lewgÊ°- (“to lie, swear, bemoan"). Cognate with West Frisian lige (“to lie"), Low German legen, lögen, Dutch liegen (“to lie"), German lügen (“to lie"), Norwegian ljuge/lyge (“to lie"), Danish lyve (“to lie"), Swedish ljuga (“to lie"), and more distantly with Bulgarian лъжа (lǎža, “to lie"), Russian лгать (lgatʹ, “to lie").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lien, liggen, from Old English licgan, from Proto-Germanic *ligjanÄ…, from Proto-Indo-European *legÊ°-. Cognate with West Frisian lizze, Dutch liggen, German liegen, Danish ligge, Swedish ligga, Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌰𐌽 (ligan); and with Latin lectus (“bed"), Irish luighe, Russian лежать (ležatʹ), Albanian lagje (“inhabited area, neighbourhood").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lie, from Old English lyÄ¡e (“lie, falsehood"), from Proto-Germanic *lugiz (“lie, falsehood"), from Proto-Indo-European *leugh- (“to tell lies, swear, complain"), *lewgÊ°-. Cognate with Old Saxon luggi (“a lie"), Old High German lugÄ« (German Lüge, “a lie"), Danish løgn (“a lie"), Bulgarian лъжа (lǎža, “а lie"),

    From Wiktionary

  • As a noun for position, the noun has the same etymology above as the verb.

    From Wiktionary