Lie Definition

lain, lay, lied, lies, lying
verb
lain, lay, lied, lies, lying
To be or put oneself in a reclining position along a relatively horizontal surface.
Webster's New World
To have, on the hole being played, a score of.
After her approach shot, she lies three on the ninth hole.
Webster's New World
To present false information with the intention of deceiving.
American Heritage
To be in a more or less horizontal position on some supporting surface.
Webster's New World
To bring, put, accomplish, etc. by lying.
To lie his way into political office.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
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noun
lies
The way in which something is situated or arranged; lay.
Webster's New World
An animal's lair or resting place.
Webster's New World
A period of resting.
Webster's New World
The position of a golf ball that has come to a stop.
American Heritage
The relative situation of a ball with reference to the advantage it offers the player.
A good lie.
Webster's New World
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abbreviation

The Long Island Expressway, I-495.

Wiktionary
idiom
lie
  • To keep oneself or one's plans hidden.
  • To bide one's time but remain ready for action.
American Heritage
lie through (one's) teeth
  • To lie outrageously or brazenly.
American Heritage
lie down on the job
  • to put forth considerably less than one's best efforts
Webster's New World
lie in
  • to be in confinement for childbirth
Webster's New World
lie low
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Lie

Noun

Singular:
lie
Plural:
lies

Origin of Lie

  • From Middle English lien (“to lie, tell a falsehood"), from Old English lÄ“ogan (“to lie"), from Proto-Germanic *leuganÄ… (“to lie"), from Proto-Indo-European *lewgÊ°- (“to lie, swear, bemoan"). Cognate with West Frisian lige (“to lie"), Low German legen, lögen, Dutch liegen (“to lie"), German lügen (“to lie"), Norwegian ljuge/lyge (“to lie"), Danish lyve (“to lie"), Swedish ljuga (“to lie"), and more distantly with Bulgarian лъжа (lǎža, “to lie"), Russian лгать (lgatʹ, “to lie").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lien, liggen, from Old English licgan, from Proto-Germanic *ligjanÄ…, from Proto-Indo-European *legÊ°-. Cognate with West Frisian lizze, Dutch liggen, German liegen, Danish ligge, Swedish ligga, Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌰𐌽 (ligan); and with Latin lectus (“bed"), Irish luighe, Russian лежать (ležatʹ), Albanian lagje (“inhabited area, neighbourhood").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lie, from Old English lyÄ¡e (“lie, falsehood"), from Proto-Germanic *lugiz (“lie, falsehood"), from Proto-Indo-European *leugh- (“to tell lies, swear, complain"), *lewgÊ°-. Cognate with Old Saxon luggi (“a lie"), Old High German lugÄ« (German Lüge, “a lie"), Danish løgn (“a lie"), Bulgarian лъжа (lǎža, “а lie"),

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English lien from Old English licgan legh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • As a noun for position, the noun has the same etymology above as the verb.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old English lyge leugh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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