Sit meaning

sĭt
To rest with the torso vertical and the body supported on the buttocks.
verb
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To cover eggs for hatching; brood.
verb
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To be situated or located.

A house that sits on a hill.

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To lie or rest.

Dishes were sitting on a shelf.

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To pose for an artist or photographer.
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To remain inactive or unused.

Her expensive skis sat gathering dust.

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To affect one with or as if with a burden; weigh.

Official duties sat heavily upon the governor.

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To fit, fall, or drape in a specified manner.

The jacket sits perfectly on you.

verb
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To be agreeable to one; please.

The idea didn't sit well with any of us.

verb
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To take an examination, as for a degree.
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To blow from a particular direction. Used of the wind.
verb
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To keep watch or take care of a child.
verb
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To cause to sit; seat.

Sit yourself over there.

verb
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To keep one's seat on (an animal).

She sits her horse well.

verb
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To sit on (eggs) for the purpose of hatching.
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To provide seating accommodation for.

A theater that sits 1,000 people.

verb
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The way in which an article of clothing, such as a dress or jacket, fits.
noun
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To cover and warm eggs for hatching; set; brood.
verb
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To pose for one's portrait or as a model.
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To take an examination (for a degree, scholarship, etc.)
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To be or remain inactive.
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To be located or have a place.

A house sitting up on the hill.

verb
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To fit or hang on the wearer.

A coat that sits loosely.

verb
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To rest or lie as specified.

Cares sit lightly upon him.

verb
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To have a certain direction; set.
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To place in a seat; cause to sit; seat.

To sit oneself down.

verb
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To keep one's seat on (a horse, etc.)
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To have seats or seating space for.
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verb
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The time spent in a seated position, esp. while waiting.
noun
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The way a coat, dress, etc. hangs when put on.
noun
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To rest with the torso vertical and the body supported on the buttocks.
verb
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To cover eggs for hatching; brood.
verb
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"Stay in touch." See digispeak. See also Stuffit.
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(intransitive, of a person) To be in a position in which the upper body is upright and the legs (especially the upper legs) are supported by some object.

After a long day of walking, it was good just to sit and relax.

verb
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(intransitive, of a person) To move oneself into such a position.

I asked him to sit.

verb
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(intransitive, of an object) To occupy a given position permanently.

The temple has sat atop that hill for centuries.

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To remain in a state of repose; to rest; to abide; to rest in any position or condition.
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(government) To be a member of a deliberative body.

I currently sit on a standards committee.

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(law, government) Of a legislative or, especially, a judicial body such as a court, to be in session.

In what city is the circuit court sitting for this session.

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To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh.
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To be adjusted; to fit.

Your new coat sits well.

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(intransitive, of an agreement or arrangement) To be accepted or acceptable; to work.

How will this new contract sit with the workers?

I don't think it will sit well.

The violence in these video games sits awkwardly with their stated aim of educating children.

verb
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To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to.

Sit him in front of the TV and he might watch for hours.

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To accommodate in seats; to seat.

The dining room table sits eight comfortably.

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(intransitive) Shortened form of babysit.

I'm going to sit for them on Thursday.

verb
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(US) To babysit.

I need to find someone to sit my kids on Friday evening for four hours.

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(Australia, New Zealand, UK) To take, to undergo or complete (an examination or test).
verb
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To cover and warm eggs for hatching, as a fowl; to brood; to incubate.
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To take a position for the purpose of having some artistic representation of oneself made, such as a picture or a bust.

I'm sitting for a painter this evening.

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To have position, as at the point blown from; to hold a relative position; to have direction.
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(rare, Buddhism) An event (usually one full day or more) where the primary goal is to sit in meditation.
noun
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To sit is defined as for a person to rest the weight of their body on their rear end or the back of their thighs or for something to be located somewhere.

An example of to sit is to place ones self in a chair.

An example of to sit is for a house to rest upon a hill.

verb
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sit on (one's) hands
  • To fail to act.
idiom
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sit pretty
  • To be in a very favorable position.
idiom
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sit tight
  • To be patient and await the next move.
idiom
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sit back
  • To relax.
  • To remain passive.
idiom
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sit down
  • To lower oneself to a sitting position; take a seat.
  • To settle down for or as for a siege.
idiom
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sit in
  • To attend a meeting, etc. without actively participating.
    To sit in on a professor's class.
idiom
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sit in for
  • To take over someone's role or duties temporarily.
idiom
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sit on
  • To serve as a member of (a jury, committee, etc.).
  • To confer on or investigate.
  • To suppress, repress, or squelch.
  • To hold (something) back from being considered or acted on.
idiom
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sit on one's hands
  • To fail to applaud.
  • To fail to do what is needed or expected.
idiom
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sit out
  • To stay until the end of.
  • To stay longer than (another); outsit.
  • To remain seated during or take no part in (a dance or other activity).
idiom
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sit up
  • To rise to a sitting position.
  • To sit erect.
  • To sit solely on the haunches, as with the forelegs upright or the front paws held up in front of the chest.
  • To put off going to bed.
  • To become suddenly alert.
idiom
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sit well with
  • To be agreeable to.
idiom
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Origin of sit

  • Middle English sitten from Old English sittan sed- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English sitten, from Old English sittan, from Proto-Germanic *sitjanÄ…, from *set-, from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (“sit"). Cognate with West Frisian sitte, Low German sitten, Dutch zitten, German sitzen, Swedish sitta; and with Irish suigh, Latin sedeo, Russian сидеть (sidetʹ).
    From Wiktionary