Hazard meaning

hăzərd
(games) A dice game similar to craps.
noun
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(archaic) Chance or an accident.
noun
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The definition of a hazard is something that is dangerous or that could cause harm.

An example of a hazard is a broken railing along the edge of a cliff, or a wet slippery floor that you could fall on.

noun
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A possible source of danger.

This room is a fire hazard.

noun
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To expose to danger or risk.
verb
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An early game of chance played with dice, from which craps is derived.
noun
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Chance, or a chance occurrence.
noun
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An obstacle on a golf course, as a sand trap or pond.
noun
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(court tennis) Any of the three openings on the side (hazard side) of the court in which service is received.
noun
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To expose to danger; chance; risk.
verb
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To attempt or venture.

To hazard a try.

verb
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(historical) A type of game played with dice. [from 14th c.]
noun
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Chance. [from 16th c.]
noun
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The chance of suffering harm; danger, peril, risk of loss. [from 16th c.]

He encountered the enemy at the hazard of his reputation and life.

noun
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An obstacle or other feature which causes risk or danger; originally in sports, and now applied more generally. [from 19th c.]

The video game involves guiding a character on a skateboard past all kinds of hazards.

noun
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(golf) Sand or water obstacle on a golf course.
noun
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(billiards) The act of potting a ball, whether the object ball (winning hazard) or the player's ball (losing hazard).
noun
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Anything that is hazarded or risked, such as a stake in gambling.
noun
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To expose to chance; to take a risk.

I'll hazard a guess.

verb
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To risk (something); to venture to incur, or bring on.
verb
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(sports) An obstacle, such as a sand trap, found on a golf course.
noun
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Origin of hazard

  • Middle English hasard a kind of dice game from Old French from Old Spanish azar unlucky throw of the dice, chance possibly from Arabic az-zahr the die al- the zahr die (possibly from zahr flowers (the losing sides of some medieval dice perhaps being decorated with images of flowers) ) (from zahara to shine, be radiant zhr in Semitic roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French hasart (“a game of dice”) (noun), hasarder (verb), probably from Arabic الزّهر (az-zahr, “the dice”). Compare Spanish, Portuguese azar.

    From Wiktionary